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Graduate Courses

  • *5301 Conservation Biology (3-0). Theory and practice of conserva­tion biology with emphasis on the maintenance of species diversity, factors affecting extinction, genetic impacts of rarity, and practical management considerations, including design of reserves and captive breeding and re­lease programs. Course meets concurrently with Biology 4301 but requires additional readings, papers, discussion, and/or presentations for graduate students.
    Prerequisites: Biology 1480, 3301, or consent of instructor.

    *5401 Ornithology (3-3). A study of the biology of birds, their anato­my, evolutionary history, diversity, ecology, behavior, and zoogeography. Laboratory exercises will emphasize the identification and natural history of Texas birds. Course meets concurrently with Biology 4401 but requires additional readings, papers, discussions, and/or presentations for graduate students.
    Prerequisites: Biology 2402 or equivalent. Permission of Graduate Advisor and Graduate Dean.

     *5402 Mammalogy (3-3). A study of the biology of mammals, their anat­omy, evolutionary history, diversity, ecology, behavior, and zoogeography. Laboratory exercises will emphasize the identification and natural history of Texas mammals. Course meets concurrently with Biology 4402 but requires additional readings, papers, discussions, and/or presentations for graduate students.
    Prerequisites: Biology 2402 or equivalent. Permission of Graduate Advisor and Graduate Dean.

    *5403 Natural History of Bats (3-3). A study of the ecology and evolution of the order Chiroptera with emphasis on unique adaptations related to the life history strategies and echolocation of North American bats. Students will gain hands-on experience with the use of taxonomic keys and field techniques used in sampling and identifying bat species in natural habitats. Course meets concurrently with Biology 4403 but requires additional read­ings, papers, discussions, and/or presentations for graduate students.
    Prerequisites: Biology 2402 or consent of the instructor. Permission of Graduate Advisor and Graduate Dean.

    *5404 Herpetology (3-3). A study of the biology of amphibians and rep­tiles, their anatomy, evolutionary history, diversity, ecology, behavior, and zoogeography. Laboratory exercises will emphasize the identification and natural history of Texas amphibians and reptiles. Course meets concur­rently with Biology 4404 but requires additional readings, papers, discus­sions, and/or presentations for graduate students.
    Prerequisites: Biology 2402 or equivalent. Permission of Graduate Advisor and Graduate Dean.

    *5421 Developmental Biology (3-3). A study of the molecular and ge­netic mechanisms regulating the development of animals. Specific topics include gametogenesis, embryogenesis, and tissue development. Labora­tory explores the development of various invertebrate and vertebrate model organisms and emphasizes the application of techniques used with these model systems. Course meets concurrently with Biology 4421 but requires additional readings, papers, discussion, and/or presentations for graduate students.
    Prerequisites: Biology 3301, 3403.

    *5423 General Physiology (3-3). An advanced course in fundamentals of vertebrate physiology emphasizing functions of molecular levels of activity. Laboratory exercises combine animal surgery, biochemical techniques, and electronic instrumentation. Course meets concurrently with Biology 4423 but requires additional readings, papers, discussions, and/or presentations for graduate students. Prerequisites: Biology 2402, 2423 or consent of instructor. Permis­sion of Graduate Advisor and Graduate Dean.

    *5435 Plant Taxonomy (3-3). Laboratory and field studies emphasize the use of a dichotomous key using flowering plants of the Concho Valley as topics of study and recognition of the major families of flowering plants. Lecture emphasis is on current problems in plant taxonomy and systemat­ics. (Credit for both RWM 4435 and Biology 5435 cannot be awarded.) Course meets concurrently with Biology 4435 but requires additional read­ings, papers, discussions and/or presentations for graduate students. Prerequisites: Permission of Graduate Advisor and Graduate Dean.

    *5441 Parasitology (3-3). A study of the anatomy, life cycles, ecology, diseases, diagnosis, and treatment of protozoa, helminths, and arthropods parasitic in man. Course meets concurrently with Biology 4441 but requires additional readings, papers, discussions, and/or presentations for graduate students. Prerequisites: Biology 1480 and 2402, or 2423 and 2424. Permission of Graduate Advisor and Graduate Dean.

    *5442 Arachnology (3-3). A study of the origin of the arachnids and their evolutionary relationships to other early arthropod groups. A survey of the recognized ordinal groups will be presented in both lecture and laboratory with respect to the existing literature on distribution, morphology, ecology, reproductive life cycles, and their relationships to man. Course meets con­currently with Biology 4442, but requires additional readings, papers, dis­cussions, and/or presentations for graduate students. Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate Advisor and Graduate Dean.

    *5443 Invertebrate Zoology (3-3). A survey of major invertebrate phyla with emphasis on the classes of Cnidarians, Annelids, Mollusks, Arthro­pods, and Enchinoderms. Particular attention will be given to phylogenetic relationships and natural history. Course meets concurrently with Biology 4443 but requires additional readings, papers, discussions, and/or presen­tations for graduate students. Prerequisites: Biology 2402 or equivalent. Permission of Graduate Advisor and Graduate Dean.

    *5444 Vertebrate Zoology (3-3). An intensive study of the living groups of vertebrates from agnathans through mammals with emphasis on functional anatomy, phylogeny, and natural history. Laboratory will emphasize com­parative vertebrate anatomy. Course meets concurrently with Biology 4444 but requires additional readings, papers, discussions, and/or presentations for graduate students.
    Prerequisites: Biology 2402 or equivalent. Permission of Graduate Advisor and Graduate Dean.

    *5450 Molecular Biology (3-4). A study of the synthesis, function, and regulation of biologically important macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and pro­teins). Laboratory exercises are designed to develop skills with standard techniques in molecular biology such as electrophoresis, PCR, recombi­nant DNA technology, DNA sequencing, and bioinformatics. Course meets concurrently with Biology 4450 but requires additional readings, papers, discussions, and/or presentations for graduate students. Prerequisites: Biology 3301, 3403. Permission of Graduate Advisor and Graduate Dean.

    *5480 Introduction to Biometry (3-2). An introduction to the application of statistics to biological research. This course will include an introduction to probability, sampling theory, and hypothesis testing. Emphasis will be on common statistical techniques for biological research. Course meets concurrently with Biology 4480, but requires additional readings, papers, discussions, and/or presentations for graduate students.
    Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate Advisor and Graduate Dean.

    6171 Seminar in Science Teaching (1-0). Weekly seminar will involve discussion of current methods of teaching in the life sciences. Students will also gain practical experience as group facilitators in one of the lecture sec­tions of Biology 1480. Must have permission of instructor to enroll.

    6181 Seminar (1-0). A review of the literature and current research in vari­ous biological fields. (May be repeated once for credit when topic varies.)

    6191, 6291, 6391 Research. Individual research problems. (May be re­peated to a total of six semester hours credit.) Approval from the Chair of the Department is required prior to enrollment.

    6301 Biometrics and Experimental Design (3-0). An examination of sta­tistical methods used in biological research. Emphasis will be on the appli­cation of statistical procedures and the design of experiments. This course will include an overview of more complex statistical procedures including multivariate methods, randomization tests, and resampling techniques.
    Prerequisite: Biology 4480 or equivalent.

    6302 Advanced Biology (3-0). A study of the basic principles of biology and levels of organization from the molecule to the community.

    6304 Advanced Instructional Methods in Science Education (3-0). Ad­dresses current teaching strategies, curriculum design, evaluation, and trends/issues in science education. Participants will explore a variety of topics relevant to the teaching and learning of science in the secondary and post-secondary classroom.

    6330 Scientific Writing (3-0). The study and practice of all aspects of scientific writing skills. This will include the preparation and critical review of manuscripts, notes, abstracts, grant applications, reports and research presentations.

    6342 Advanced Genetics (3-0). The study of recent advances in genetics with an emphasis on modern methods of analysis and applications such as genetic testing, gene therapy, genetic engineering, and forensic genetics. Prerequisite: Biology 3301 or equivalent.

    6351 Evolutionary Ecology (3-0). An examination of theoretical models and empirical studies of life history and foraging strategies, competition, predation, mate choice, parental care, community structure, and other top­ics in ecology.

    6353 Limnology (2-3). An examination of the physical-biological interac­tions in aquatic ecosystems. Emphasis will be placed upon the composi­tion, variation, and dynamics of fresh water communities.

    6354 Physiological Ecology (3-0). A comparative study of the anatomi­cal and physiological adaptations associated with thermoregulation, food, water, and oxygen deprivation. Problems related to adaptation and the main­tenance of homeostasis will be stressed.

    6381 Special Topics (3-0). Selected topics in advanced biology. (May be repeated once for credit when topic varies.)

    6399 Thesis. A total of six hours is required for thesis. This course must be repeated once. Students have the option of enrolling in Biology 6699 to fulfill the thesis requirement in one semester.

    6411 Microbial Ecology (3-3). A study of the interrelationships of mi­croorganisms in nature and their impact on macroorganisms. Topics will include but not be limited to antibiosis, biofilm formation, co-evolution, normal microbial flora of macroorganisms, competition, commensalism, succession, extreme environments, and growth rate. The laboratory will emphasize the isolation and identification of microorganisms from various ecological niches.

    6431 Principles of Molecular Systematics (3-3). A study of the basic principles of molecular systematics. This course will include the history and concepts of systematics as well as a review of selected current topics in the field. The laboratory will emphasize the understanding of methodologies used to address specific phylogenetic questions with molecular data.

    6699 Thesis. A total of six hours is required for thesis credit. Students have the option of enrolling in Biology 6399 for two separate semesters in order to fulfill the six hour thesis requirement.

    *A maximum of two 5000-level courses totaling no more than eight semester credit hours may be taken for graduate credit by graduate students and applied to the graduate degree plan. Permission of the Graduate Advisor or Chair of the Department and the Graduate Dean is required.