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Information for:

Title II / Higher Education Act Report 2008-2009

Angelo State University
Traditional Program
2008-09

Program Information

Name of Institution: Angelo State University
Institution/Program Type: Traditional
Academic Year: 2008-09
State: Texas
 
Address: ASU Station #10914
San Angelo, TX, 76909
Contact Name: Dr. John Miazga
Phone: 325-942-2212
Email: jmiazga@angelo.edu

Is your institution a member of a Teacher Quality Enhancement (TQE) partnership grant: No

TQE partnership name or grant number, if applicable:

Section I.a Program Admission

For each element listed below, check if it is required for admission into any of your initial teacher certification program(s) at either the undergraduate or postgraduate level.

Element Undergraduate Postgraduate
Application Yes  Yes 
Fee/Payment No  No 
Transcript Yes  Yes 
Fingerprint check No  No 
Background check No  No 
Experience in a classroom or working with children No  Yes 
Minimum number of courses/credites/semester hours completed Yes  Yes 
Minimum high school GPA No  No 
Minimum undergraduate GPA Yes  Yes 
Minimum GPA in content area coursework Yes  Yes 
Minimum GPA in professional education coursework No  No 
Minimum ACT score Yes  Yes 
Minimum SAT score Yes  Yes 
Minimum GRE score Yes  Yes 
Minimum basic skills test score Yes  Yes 
Subject area/academic content test or other subject matter verification Yes  Yes 
Minimum Miller Analogies test score No  No 
Recommendation(s) No  No 
Essay or personal statement No  Yes 
Interview No  No 
Resume No  No 
Bechelor's degree or higher No  Yes 
Job offer from school/district No  No 
Personality test (e.g.,Myers-Briggs Assessment) No  No 
Other (specify: ) No  No 

Provide a link to your website where additional information about admissions requirements can be found:
http://www.angelo.edu/dept/ceducation/certprocedures.html#adm

Indicate when students are formally admitted into your initial teacher certification program:
Other   After 60 semester credit hours.

Does your initial teacher certification program conditionally admit students? No

Please provide any additional about or exceptions to the admissions information provided above:

Candidates are required to demonstrate proficiency in mathematics, reading, writing, and speaking.

Section I.b Program Enrollment

Provide the number of students in the teacher preparation program in the following categories. Note that you must report on the number of students by ethnicity and race separately. Individuals who are non-Hispanic/Latino will be reported in one of the race categories. Also note that individuals can belong to one or more racial groups, so the sum of the members of each racial category may not necessarily add up to the total number of students enrolled.

Total number of students enrolled in 2008-09: 955 
Unduplicated number of males enrolled in 2008-09: 236 
Unduplicated number of females enrolled in 2008-09: 719 
2008-09 Number enrolled
Ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino of any race: 196 
Race
American Indian or Alaska Native:
Asian:
Black or African American: 26 
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander:
White: 726 
Two or more races:

Section I.c Supervised Experience

Provide the following information about supervised clinical experience in 2008-09.

Average number of clock hours required prior to student teaching  92 
Average number of clock hours required for student teaching  550 
Number of full-time equivalent faculty in supervised clinical experience during this academic year  0 
Number of full-time equivalent adjunct faculty in supervised clinical experience during this academic year (IHE and PreK-12 staff)  7 
Number of students in supervised clinical experience during this academic year  148 

Please provide any additional information about or descriptions of the supervised clinical experiences:

Professional field experiences are a vital component of all educator preparation programs at Angelo State. These field experiences enable teacher candidates to successively observe, assist, and finally teach individuals and groups of students. As candidates progress from observer to practitioner, the field experiences serve as an invaluable bridge between content and practice.

ASU places a strong emphasis on factors pertaining to candidates having diverse experiences over a spectrum of demographics. Numerous factors are strongly considered in the selection of placements to ensure that candidates have opportunities to work with diverse groups of students. All candidates have field experiences in diverse settings with each successive placement decision based on careful examination of previous placements. The Director of Field Experiences maintains field site demographic reports and a candidate placement database. This procedure ensures that over the course of a program, candidates complete field assignments in several different settings which provide experiences with populations of cultural, economic, racial/ethnic diversity as well as working with special needs students.

The clinical experiences begin early in the program and include placements with diverse learners in diverse settings. Appropriate placements in all certification programs, Elementary, Special Education and Secondary are progressive. Experiences vary from observations to small group instruction culminating with full-time practice teaching during student teaching. Candidates are mentored and guided as they progress and reflect upon their developing teaching skills.

Student teaching is the application and culmination of the candidates' learning experience in the Educator Preparation Program. Once a candidate applies for clinical practice, the Department of Teacher Education coordinates with area school districts to place the candidate with a highly-qualified, supervising teacher. Supervised student teaching lasts fourteen weeks over the course of one semester. Student Teaching experiences allow for a gradual release of responsibility until teacher candidates assume full responsibility for students in a classroom. The experience is carefully planned, involves careful guidance and supervision, and is assessed both formatively and summatively. The university supervisor and the supervising teacher collaborate to produce a series of interim evaluations along with a final evaluation.

Section I.d Certified Licensed

Provide the number of students who have been certified or licensed as teachers, by subject and area of certification or licensure.

Teaching subject/area Number certified/ licensed 2008-09 Number certified/ licensed 2007-08 Number certified/ licensed 2006-07
TOTAL (all areas/subjects) 144  163  146 
Art EC-12
Chemistry 8-12
English Language Arts and Reading 4-8
English Language Arts and Reading 8-12
Generalist 4-8
Generalist EC-4 84  85  78 
History 8-12
Journalism 8-12
Life Science 8-12
Mathematics 4-8
Mathematics 8-12
Mathematics/Science 4-8
Music EC-12
Physical Education EC-12 19  29  23 
Physical Science 8-12
Science 4-8
Social Studies 4-8
Social Studies 8-12
Spanish 6-12
Special Education EC-12 18  15  12 
Speech 8-12
Theatre Arts EC-12

Section I.e Program Completers

Provide the total number of initial teacher certification preparation program completers in each of the following academic years:

2008-09: 152

2007-08: 167

2006-07: 170

Section II. Annual Goals

Each institution of higher education (IHE) that conducts a traditional teacher preparation program (including programs that offer any ongoing professional development programs) or alternative routes to state certification or licensure program, and that enrolls students receiving Federal assistance under this Act, shall set annual quantifiable goals for increasing the number of prospective teachers trained in teacher shortage areas designated by the Secretary or by the state educational agency, including mathematics, science, special education, and instruction of limited English proficient students. IHEs that do not have a teacher preparation program in one or more of the areas listed below can enter NA for the area(s) in which the IHE does not have that program.

Teacher shortage area Goal for increasing prospective teachers trained
Mathematics

Academic year: 2010-11

Goal: 10% Increase

Goal met?

Description of strategies used to achieve goal:

Dual credit summer program for high achieving mathematics students

Open House by Mathematics Department featuring teacher certification

Mathematics club feature teaching as a profession

Future teachers club feature mathematics teaching as a profession in an open forum

Promote teaching during university orientation course.

Description of steps to improve performance in meeting goal or lessons learned in meeting goal:

Science

Academic year: 2010-11

Goal: 10% Increase

Goal met?

Description of strategies used to achieve goal:

Future Teachers' Club featuring science educators' presentation

Physics club featuring science educator

Promote science teaching at public school science fairs

Promote science teaching at science days.

Promote teaching during university orientation course.

Description of steps to improve performance in meeting goal or lessons learned in meeting goal:

Special education

Academic year: 2010-11

Goal: 10% Increase

Goal met?

Description of strategies used to achieve goal:

Promote teaching during university orientation course.

Use special education ambassadors at recruitment fairs

Use special education ambassadors at orientation to recruit

Promote open meetings of the Council for Exceptional Children meetings

Description of steps to improve performance in meeting goal or lessons learned in meeting goal:

Instruction of limited English proficient students

Academic year:

Goal: N/A

Goal met?

Description of strategies used to achieve goal:

Description of steps to improve performance in meeting goal or lessons learned in meeting goal:

Other

Academic year:

Goal:

Goal met?

Description of strategies used to achieve goal:

Description of steps to improve performance in meeting goal or lessons learned in meeting goal:

Provide any additional comments, exceptions and explanations below:

Section II. Assurances

Please indicate whether your institution is in compliance with the following assurances.

Training provided to prospective teachers responds to the identified needs of the local educational agencies or States where the institution's graduates are likely to teach, based on past hiring and recruitment trends.
Yes

Training provided to prospective teachers is closely linked with the needs of schools and the instructional decisions new teachers face in the classroom.
Yes

Prospective special education teachers receive coursework in core academic subjects and receive training in providing instruction in core academic subjects.
Yes

General education teachers receive training in providing instruction to children with disabilities.
Yes

General education teachers receive training in providing instruction to limited English proficient students.
Yes

General education teachers receive training in providing instruction to children from low-income families.
Yes

Prospective teachers receive training on how to effectively teach in urban and rural schools, as applicable.
Yes

Describe your institution's most successful strategies in meeting the assurances listed above:

Educator Preparation at ASU is a wholly standards-based program. First and foremost, all programs are developed from state standards and approved by the Texas State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC). Additionally, many of ASU's Educator Preparation program areas also ascribe to and meet standards from national professional associations. All preparation programs infuse the expectations from Texas public school standards as well as the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills framework (TEKS) and the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) measures of achievement and accountability. All program experiences, coursework, assignments, and field experiences, are aligned with standards and expectations, proficiencies, and outcomes delineated for all teacher certification areas. In this regard, the entire preparation program is held accountable.

The development of teacher candidates in the Educator Preparation Program (EPP) is progressive and cumulative. Candidates are assessed at numerous key points in their academic and pedagogical programs. The final application and reflection experience, supervised student teaching is evaluated over a fourteen-week experience in diverse school settings with diverse learners. To evaluate clinical teaching, ASU has adopted the Texas Beginning Educator Support System (TxBESS), a framework for preparation of educators, evaluation of teachers' knowledge and skills, and support for emerging professionals. The components of the TxBESS framework focus first on the learner and the school community. Educator candidates gather descriptive and demographic information about their learners and schools. Then they apply this information when incorporating standards and expectations for instruction and assessment of learners. Planning, analysis, and reflection are evident in every aspect of the candidate teacher's emerging competence. Observation and evaluation by a highly qualified classroom teacher and supervision by university personnel occurs formally in four benchmark conference sessions where strengths and areas for improvement are discussed with the candidate and where the candidate demonstrates his or her effect on student learning.

ASU's Educator Preparation Program is a learner-centered model rather than a traditional teacher development model. Candidates analyze the effects and impact of their instructional plans and decisions and make new plans reflective of student achievement and needs.

Candidates in the EPP have specific course content and experiences in the areas of Special Education. At the elementary preparation level, all candidates are required to complete a semester course in exceptionalities. Then, experiences with special needs students are infused into other program courses and field settings. At the secondary preparation level candidates also complete content and experiences focused on exceptional learners. Some candidates choose to add All-level Special Education certification to their preparation programs. These candidates have multiple experiences and specialization in teaching learners with special needs.

In response to the diversity of its population, the state of Texas has developed standards and proficiencies related to teaching Limited English Proficiency (LEP) learners. All candidates in approved elementary and middle level certification programs must complete coursework and experiences addressing the needs of linguistically diverse learners. The EPP at ASU has developed a specific required course, entitled Linguistically Diverse Learners, and has appropriately included culturally and linguistically responsive teaching strategies in all of the pedagogy courses. The combination of specific content and infused practice supports a candidate's competence in this vital area.

Linguistic diversity is only one area of focus in the EPP's embracing of diversity experiences for its candidates. Early in every preparation program diversity sensitivities, cultural responsiveness, and differentiated instruction are introduced, then practiced, and applied. These are coupled with dispositions and beliefs sensitive to the backgrounds, heritage, and needs of diverse learners. There is not, however, a compartmentalized "diversity training session." Rather, the attitudes and practices of embracing diverse learners and their needs are infused in programs. The result is that educator graduates from Angelo State University are prepared to teach and live in West Texas and beyond.

In a commitment to excellence and a response to high-quality ideals, Angelo State has made application and completed an exhaustive self-study to become accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. Meeting national standards of excellence in the preparation of educators becomes yet another measure of the dedication of the faculty, staff, and students of this institution. Becoming nationally accredited absolutely supports the mission of the educator preparation program.

Section III. Assessment Rates

Assessment code - Assessment name
Test Company
Group
Number
taking
test
Avg.
scaled
score
Number
passing
test
Pass
rate
(%)
State
Average
pass rate
(%)
State
Average
scaled
score
178 -Art EC-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
         
178 -Art EC-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
         
140 -Chemistry 8-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
         
140 -Chemistry 8-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
         
117 -English Language Arts and Reading 4-8 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
         
131 -English Language Arts and Reading 8-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
         
131 -English Language Arts and Reading 8-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
         
111 -Generalist 4-8 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
         
111 -Generalist 4-8 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
         
101 -Generalist EC-4 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
79    78  99     
101 -Generalist EC-4 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
87    87  100     
133 -History 8-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
         
133 -History 8-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
         
138 -Life Science 8-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
         
138 -Life Science 8-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
         
114 -Math/Science 4-8 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
         
114 -Math/Science 4-8 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
         
115 -Mathematics 4-8 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
         
115 -Mathematics 4-8 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
         
135 -Mathematics 8-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
         
135 -Mathematics 8-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
         
110 -Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities 4-8 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
16    16  100     
110 -Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities 4-8 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
14    14  100     
130 -Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities 8-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
29    28  97     
130 -Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities 8-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
33    32  97     
160 -Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities EC-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
37    31  84     
160 -Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities EC-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
40    37  93     
100 -Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities EC-4 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
80    77  96     
100 -Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities EC-4 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
86    84  98     
158 -Physical Education EC-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
29    27  93     
158 -Physical Education EC-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
32    32  100     
116 -Science 4-8 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
         
116 -Science 4-8 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
         
118 -Social Studies 4-8 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
         
132 -Social Studies 8-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
         
132 -Social Studies 8-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
         
047 -Spanish 6-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
         
047 -Spanish 6-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
         
081 -Spanish Oral Proficiency (TOPT) 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
         
081 -Spanish Oral Proficiency (TOPT) 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
         
161 -Special Education EC-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
17    15  88     
161 -Special Education EC-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
18    16  89     
155 -Speech 8-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
         
155 -Speech 8-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
         
180 -Theatre EC-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2008-09 
         
180 -Theatre EC-12 
Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
All program completers, 2007-08 
         

Section III. Summary Rates

Academic Year Number taking one or
more required tests
Number passing
all tests taken
Pass Rate
(%)
Statewide average
pass rate
(%)
All program completers, 2008-09  165  149  90   
All program completers, 2007-08  175  167  95   

Section IV. Low-Performing

Provide the following information about the approval or accreditation of your teacher preparation program.

Is your teacher preparation program currently approved or accredited?
Yes

If yes, please specify the organization(s) that approved or accredited your program:
State

Is your teacher preparation program currently under a designation as "low-performing" by the state (as per section 207(a) of the HEA of 2008)?
No

Section V. Technology

Does your program prepare teachers to:

  • integrate technology effectively into curricula and instruction
    Yes
  • use technology effectively to collect data to improve teaching and learning
    Yes
  • use technology effectively to manage data to improve teaching and learning
    Yes
  • use technology effectively to analyze data to improve teaching and learning
    Yes

Provide a description of how your program prepares teachers to integrate technology effectively into curricula and instruction, and to use technology effectively to collect, manage, and analyze data in order to improve teaching and learning for the purpose of increasing student academic achievement. Include a description of how your program prepares teachers to use the principles of universal design for learning, as applicable. Include planning activities and a timeline if any of the four elements listed above are not currently in place.

Angelo State University has an institutional skills requirement in the area of technology literacy. The Educator Preparation Program identifies specific competencies and applications suitable for teacher education. Additionally, almost every academic experience utilizes the components of Blackboard as the portal for instruction and technology. In Educator Preparation, this is an expectation in all arenas.

During the first courses in professional education, candidates are introduced to TaskStream, an online platform and repository for cumulative professional experiences in education. Early on, candidates use components of TaskStream to develop and practice elements of instructional planning. All candidates are prepared in the knowledge and skills as prescribed in the Texas Education Agency/State Board of Educator Certification document: "Technology Requirements for Beginning Teachers."

An increasing amount of instruction is now becoming available on line or web blended. These choices for candidates can be positive. The expectations are that all candidates use technology in academic pursuits.

All members of the campus community rely on electronic communications and data submission. Academic progress is available to candidates and to faculty advisors electronically.

All admission/application forms for Educator Preparation are accessed and completed on line. Candidates are notified instantaneously when an application has been approved.

The technology of TaskStream allows candidates to plan and develop instruction, to share resources, to receive feedback, and to showcase progress. Clinical practice is also evaluated using rubrics and evaluation tools available on TaskStream.

Real and relevant technology experiences are a part of most course experiences. A variety of representations are expected.

Section VI. Teacher Training

Does your program prepare general education teachers to:

  • teach students with disabilities effectively
    Yes
  • participate as a member of individualized education program teams
    Yes
  • teach students who are limited English proficient effectively
    Yes

Provide a description of how your program prepares general education teachers to teach students with disabilities effectively, including training related to participation as a member of individualized education program teams, as defined in section 614(d)(1)(B) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and to effectively teach students who are limited English proficient. Include planning activities and a timeline if any of the three elements listed above are not currently in place.

All educator preparation candidates complete coursework and experiences specifically directed to the knowledge and skills and dispositions necessary to teach learners with special needs and exceptionalities in any classroom. Elementary level candidates complete a semester-long course, entitled, A Survey of Exceptionalities. Included in this course is a minimum of 10-clock hours of field observations in classrooms with special needs students. Secondary level candidates complete coursework, experiences and observations in consort with their "4 Core" pedagogy courses prior to student teaching. All initial certification candidates have direct and applied experiences with special needs students as a part of their supervised clinical teaching.

In both levels, content related to characteristics of students with disabilities and defining conditions are presented within legal requirements and mandates as well as within practical planning and decision-making for instruction and achievement. Candidates are introduced to individualized education program teams and their roles as classroom teachers in contributing to the development of educational plans for identified students.

Candidates are also introduced to knowledge, skills, and dispositions related to teaching students who are Limited English Proficient (LEP). This unique learning need of many students in this part of the United States is again met with specific required coursework, Linguistically Diverse Learners, for knowledge and skills, and field experiences for dispositions and applications unique to the needs of LEP students.

Often, pre-service candidates and in-service teachers return for additional course experiences to augment their initial preparation related to teaching students with disabilities.


Does your program prepare special education teachers to:

  • teach students with disabilities effectively
    Yes
  • participate as a member of individualized education program teams
    Yes
  • teach students who are limited English proficient effectively
    Yes

Provide a description of how your program prepares special education teachers to teach students with disabilities effectively, including training related to participation as a member of individualized education program teams, as defined in section 614(d)(1)(B) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and to effectively teach students who are limited English proficient. Include planning activities and a timeline if any of the three elements listed above are not currently in place.

Candidates preparing to be special education teachers are prepared to be elementary teachers and all-level special education teachers. These individuals take a specific 18 SCH sequence of courses in addition to student teaching in a special education classroom along with preparation to be a classroom teacher. There are 6 SCH of special education practicum experiences prior to student teaching where the candidates experience all aspects of working with special students including ARDS and ESL students. These candidates also take a course that focuses on the learning needs of ESL students: Linguistically Diverse Learners.

The progression of courses and experiences in Special Education fully prepares the candidate to participate in the individualized education program (IEP) preparation process. It also prepares the candidate to work with regular education teachers in implementing the IEP and other recommendations of the ARD committee.

Candidates can also minor in special education at the middle and secondary level. This preparation focuses on the highly qualified standards for secondary school special education teachers.

Often, in-service teachers return for additional specialization at the graduate level in Special Education or Educational Diagnostics.

Section VII. Contextual Information

Please use this space to provide any additional information that describes your teacher preparation program(s). You may also attach information to this report card. The U.S. Department of Education is especially interested in any evaluation plans or interim or final reports that may be available.

What is unique about the Angelo State University Educator Preparation Program (EPP)?

Candidates and other college students choose Angelo State for its vision, mission, academic programs, history, traditions, and dedication to success:

  • The ASU educator candidate population reflects the demographics of West Texas and beyond. Substantial numbers of candidates represent first generation college students, non-native English speakers, diversity in heritage and culture, economic status, and geography.
  • Teacher Education Faculty, and other contributing university faculty combined, have completed hundreds of years of teaching, professional research, scholarly accomplishments, and service to the university, public schools, and the community at large.
  • The Educator Preparation Program is large enough to be comprehensive in its preparation of teachers and other school personnel. It is small enough to reflect personal commitment on the part of the faculty to nurture and support the development of candidates. Approximately 30 percent of ASU graduates are Educator Preparation Program completers. This percentage climbs to 47 percent at the graduate level.
  • The Robert G. and Nona K. Carr Foundation is one of the largest private endowments for scholarship assistance for a university the size of Angelo State. Carr scholarships are awarded annually to one in every six ASU students, many of whom are in the Educator Preparation Program.
  • Candidates who successfully complete the Educator Preparation Program are sought after by school districts for employment. They are highly qualified and well prepared to be effective teachers or other school professionals when they complete the Educator Preparation Program.

Angelo State University is a senior, public, regional 4-year comprehensive educational institution meeting the local and far-reaching needs of learners. Angelo State is a member of the Texas Tech University System. It is located in the city of San Angelo (population 100,000) near the exact geographic center of the state of Texas. Some would say the city is the true heart of Texas; others describe the community as located in west central Texas.

ASU is a dynamic institution of higher education long recognized for its strong academic programs, its technological sophistication, and its nurturing environment, all of which help students reach their full potential. Angelo State draws its students primarily from west central Texas, but almost all of the 254 counties in TX send students to study at ASU. The institution's location and rich history contribute to attracting a substantial number of first generation college students. Additionally, numerous students arrive to study at ASU having been non-native English speakers.

College student demographics at Angelo State denote approximately two-thirds Caucasian population and one- fourth Hispanic heritage. The institution has met the eligibility requirements for designation as an Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI). The College of Education serves approximately one fourth of the total enrollment in educator preparation. The college recommends between 20-25% of the campus population for graduation.

The student/faculty ratio at ASU is 20/1. As a comprehensive university, Angelo State touches tomorrow in the lives of students, in the growth of their communities, whether local or global, and in the pursuit of the common good of society. Angelo State offers both undergraduate and graduate programs and has a student population of more than 6200, which includes both residential and commuting students.

A significant portion of the EPP candidate population is identified as non-traditional in age, experience, family circumstances, background, and need. These candidates may also be commuters. As they progress through their programs, they form cohort support groups that last long after graduation. Candidates supporting candidates is a unique characteristic of ASU's programs.

Large enough to make significant and innovative impact on the region and in society, ASU Educator Preparation is also small enough to be personal and supportive. Faculty in Professional Education makes connections with their students as program advisors and professors both on campus and in the field. Candidates know faculty and know their assigned program advisors. They develop strong relationships during the preparation program. Faculty develops relationships with their candidates and follow and support them from freshman to senior years and beyond.

The Angelo State University faculty supports its dynamic Educator Preparation Program with high expectations for all learners. Candidates are challenged to integrate content knowledge, pedagogical skills, professional dispositions, instructional decision-making, student-centered learning, and culturally relevant and responsive teaching to become effective practitioners in diverse learning communities.

The Educator Preparation Program Vision at Angelo State is preparing: A New Generation of Educators to Lead Others toward lifelong learning. ASU provides a full range of educational opportunities that prepares students for successful careers and for entry into graduate and professional schools.

Academically, the university is organized with six colleges – Business, Education, Liberal and Fine Arts, Sciences, Nursing and Allied Health, and Graduate Studies. The College of Education began as a department. It then progressed in focus and size to the School of Education. Most recently, it became the College of Education, with departments of Teacher Education and Curriculum and Instruction. These changes are indicative of the University's continuing emphasis on the importance of Educator Preparation and its support of and commitment to achieving national accreditation. In April of 2010, the Educator Preparation Program completed the initial accreditation self-study process and review from the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). National accreditation will continue to communicate Angelo State's commitment to excellence in teacher education.

Not only does Angelo State provide excellent academic preparation for students but also excellent facilities for learning and living. Angelo State has the financial resources to help its students reach their educational goals. Long-time ASU supporter, Robert G. Carr, upon his death in 1978, established a foundation funded by his mineral and royalty interests from oil-producing properties in 16 West Texas counties. His wife, Nona Carr, would add her interest in those properties to the foundation upon her death nine years later. The Robert G. and Nona K. Carr Foundation, established to provide scholarships for "needy and worthy" students, would have a profound impact on Angelo State. The first scholarships were awarded in 1981. By 2007 the fund was valued at more than $65 million and provided scholarships for one in every six ASU students for an annual total of 3.3 million dollars. Additionally, the College of Education and other academic departments are housed in the Robert G. and Nona K. Carr Building on the campus.

Success at ASU, in the classroom, in student organizations, or on playing fields, translates into success in life. ASU graduates have headed major national corporations, played in Super Bowls, anchored national newscasts, served on Pulitzer Prize juries, held statewide political office, and made numerous contributions to their communities and society. Angelo State has grown substantially since its initial role as San Angelo Junior College in 1928. In 1965, it became a four-year, baccalaureate granting institution, and in 1969, its name was changed to Angelo State University. In 2007 Angelo State became a member of the Texas Tech University System.

Supporting Files

ASU NCATE Conceptual Framework

ASU NCATE Institutional Report

TEA Site Visit Summary

Angelo State University
Traditional Program
2008-09