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    Prof. Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai has published a new essay in an edited collection titled Massachusetts and the Civil War: The Commonwealth and National Disunion (University of Massachusetts Press, 2015). Wongsrichanalai first presented the essay titled “The Union of Gentlemen Restored: College-Educated Northern Veterans, Reconciliation, and Northern Honor” at a conference at the Massachusetts Historical Society in 2013. Wongsrichanalai argues that northern gentlemen’s concept of honor helped foster their reconciliation with their southern counterparts after the Civil War.
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    Profs. Christine Lamberson and Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai sat down for an interview with Marfa Public Radio when they visited the West Texas town for their National Endowment for the Humanities-sponsored project,” War Stories: West Texans and the Experience of War, World War I to the Present.” While there, they interviewed local residents about their service experiences. Profs. John E. Klingemann and Kathryn Ostrofsky also participated in the Marfa event.

    Listen to their interview with Marfa Public Radio here
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    Dr. Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai of Angelo State University’s History Department faculty and Kimberly Wirth, business manager and community engagement coordinator for ASU’s Porter Henderson Library, have been awarded a one-year $3,000 grant to present programs on campus and for the larger San Angelo community on the history of Latino Americans.

  • Dr. Bruce E. Bechtol Jr. of the Department of Security Studies and Criminal Justice, Dr. David P. Dewar of the Department of History and Dr. James W. Ward of the Department of Physics and Geosciences have been named the winners of Angelo State University’s 2015 President’s Awards for Faculty Excellence.
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    Prof. Kenna Archer recently spoke at the San Antonio Book Festival about her book, Unruly Waters:  A Social and Environmental History of the Brazos River.  The festival, held annually by the San Antonio Public Library Foundation, attracted more than 10,000 visitors last year and was expected to pass that number this year.  Roughly ninety authors from around the country were invited to speak at the festival.  Prof. Archer spoke on a panel about water policy and water concerns in western states.  Her panel - “Running (Out of) Water” - was singled out by the directors before the festival as one of the four panels they were most excited about attending.   After the talk, she signed copies of her book and answered questions about water issues specific to this state.
  • A book of essays about intellectual life in the Civil War era co-edited by Dr. Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai of the Angelo State University history faculty has been published by Fordham University Press.

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    The Department of History’s Civil War Sesquicentennial Commemoration Lecture Series concluded on April 9, 2015, the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the surrender of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia to Union forces. Profs. Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai and Christine Lamberson discussed the legacy of the Civil War. Wongsrichanalai spoke about Reconstruction and the process of reconciliation while Lamberson noted the unfulfilled promises of the war on the Civil Rights Movement in the twentieth century.
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    On April 1, 2015, Fordham University Press published Prof. Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai’s co-edited (with Prof. Lorien Foote, Texas A&M) volume of essays about intellectual life in the Civil War Era. Wongsrichanalai’s essay “Lessons of War” is also in the collection, which showcases work from both established and up-and-coming scholars. The book, So Conceived and So Dedicated: Intellectual Life in the Civil War-Era North, is part of Fordham University Press’s “The North’s Civil War” series and seeks to expand on the idea of intellectual life and culture. The volume was inspired by the late George M. Fredrickson’s 1965 publication, The Inner Civil War.
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    Mr. Preston Lewis, former director of the Office of Communications, and Prof. Tina Doyle from the Department of Communications spoke to an audience at the C. J. Davidson Center on the topics of journalism and photography during the Civil War era. Mr. Lewis discussed several important developments and individuals that helped record events of the war while Prof. Doyle explained the technological advances made in photography as well as the challenges that photographers faced during the period.
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    Profs. Jeff Womack (Department of Visual and Performing Arts) and Kathryn Ostrofsky (Department of History) gave two lectures about the musical traditions that informed Civil War Era Americans. Prof. Womack discussed the New England Singing School movement while Prof. Ostrofsky introduced the audience to artists such as Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield, Stephen Foster, and the Hutchinsons.