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Symposium on American Values

C. Edwin Baker   delivered the paper, “Market Threats to Press Freedom,” at the 1998 University Symposium, Eye on The Media: American Values, The Media, and Popular Culture. Professor Baker is Nicholas F. Gallicchio Professor in the School of Law at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a recognized legal expert in the fields of communications law, constitutional law, and civil rights. Professor Baker is a member of the United States Supreme Court Bar and the Oregon State Bar. He has written numerous articles, made presentations, and delivered commentaries on matters related to communications and constitutional law. His articles, interviews, and commentaries on a wide range of aspects of communications law have appeared in many law reviews and law journals throughout the nation, and in publications such as The Philadelphia Inquirer, The New York Times, and The Nation. Professor Baker is author of two books that deal in-depth with key issues concerning the media and the law. His book, Human Liberty and Freedom of Speech, originally appeared in 1989 and was reprinted in paperback in 1992. His second book, Advertising and a Democratic Press, was published in 1994.

Walter Berns   is John M. Olin University Professor Emeritus at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., and Resident Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. His presentation, “The Constitution and the Pursuit of American Happiness,” was a featured lecture at the 1987 University Symposium, We the People, Constitutional Ideals and the American Experience: A Bicentennial Perspective. A native of Chicago, Illinois, Professor Berns served in the U.S. Navy during World War II prior to undertaking undergraduate studies at Reed College and the London School of Economics and Political Science. He holds the M.A. and the Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago. Professor Berns’ achievements have been honored by some of the nation’s most prestigious foundations and academic institutions. He has been named a Carnegie Teaching Fellow, a Rockefeller Fellow, a Fulbright Fellow, and a Guggenheim Fellow, and he has served on the Council of Scholars at the Library of Congress. Professor Berns is widely recognized as a distinguished scholar of the United States Constitution, American government, and political theory. He is author or editor of numerous books on these topics, including Freedom, Virtue, and the First Amendment; Constitutional Cases in American Government; The First Amendment and the Future of American Democracy; For Capital Punishment: Crime and the Morality of the Death Penalty; In Defense of Liberal Democracy; Taking the Constitution Seriously; and After the People Vote: A Guide to the Electoral College.

Doris Betts  , Alumni Distinguished Professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, gave the featured lecture, “Dimensions of Creativity in an American Context,” at the 1989 University Symposium on The Arts and American Values. A writer since childhood, she published her first book in 1954, a short story collection entitled, The Gentle Insurrection, which won the University of North Carolina Putnam Book prize. Since then she has published several more collections of short stories and writings, novels, a text on creative writing, and numerous writings in anthologies, scholarly journals, and popular magazines. Two of her novels, Tall Houses in Winter, and The Scarlet Thread, and one of her short stories collections, Beasts of the Southern Wild were Sir Walter Raleigh award winning works for the best fiction by a North Carolinian. Her 1981 novel, Heading West, was a Book of the Month Club selection, and one of her most widely reprinted short stories, “The Ugliest Pilgrim,” was adapted into the 1982 Academy Award winning film, “Violet.” In 1997, the musical, “Violet,” played off-Broadway and received eight major awards, including “best musical” from the New York Drama Critics Circle. Betts’ most recent novels are Souls Raised from the Dead and The Sharp Teeth of Love.

Peter C. Bishop   is Professor of Human Sciences and Chair of the Studies of the Future Program at the University of Houston at Clear Lake City. As one of Texas’ most important futurists, Professor Bishop wrote “The Future of Texas: Texas 2000 Revisited” for the 1986 University Symposium, Texas Past, Texas Present, & Texas Future. He received his Ph.D. and M.A. degrees from Michigan State University in Sociology, and joined the faculty of the University of Houston-Clear Lake in 1976. He now serves as Executive Director of the Institute for Futures Research and he is former Director of the Space Business Research Center. Professor Bishop has conducted numerous consultations and workshops on future studies and strategic planning for such groups as IBM, Caltex Petroleum, HealthTrust, Shell Pipeline Corporation, and the Texas Department of Commerce. Dr. Bishop has worked at NASA’s Johnson Space Center where he studied the behavioral and organizational aspects of planning, developing and implementing computer information systems. Currently he serves as the planning and evaluation officer for NASA’s MidContinent Technology Transfer Center.

Elise Boulding   was Chair of the Department of Sociology at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, and also Adjunct Professor of Sociology at the University of Colorado at Boulder when she delivered the featured lecture, “Neighborhood Values in a Global Context,” at the 1984 University Symposium, Perspectives on American Values. Born in Oslo, Norway, Professor Boulding received her B.A. degree in English from Douglass College, her M.A. degree in sociology from Iowa State College, and the Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan. Dr. Boulding has distinguished herself as a sociologist with a global view. She has conducted numerous transnational comparative studies on such topics as conflict and peace, social and economic development, family life, and the status of women in society. Her extensive publications in these areas include Handbook of International Data on Women, Children’s Rights and the Wheel of Life, Bibliography on World Conflict and Peace, and The Social System of the Planet Earth. The main points from her address to the 1984 University Symposium can be reviewed in her book, The Underside of History: A View of Women Through Time.

Anne Wells Branscomb  , one of the nation’s leading authorities on communications and computer law, presented the featured presentation, “Who Owns the Internet?,” at the 1996 University Symposium, American Values in Cyberspace: Issues of the Information Age. Named a “cyberBrahmin” by Boston magazine and called a “national treasure” by John Naisbitt, the well-known author of Megatrends, Mrs. Branscomb was author of Who Owns Information?, President of the Raven Group, and a research associate of the Harvard University Program on Information Resources Policy. She was one of the first policy analysts to use the term “information infrastructure,” and was at the forefront of developments in the law concerning the impact of computer communication. Mrs. Branscomb was an honor graduate of the George Washington University Law School, held the M.A. degree in political science from Harvard University, and B.A. degrees from the University of North Carolina and Georgia College. During the 1990s, Mrs. Branscomb provided leadership to groups of lawyers and policy experts in several key policy studies conducted by the National Conference of Lawyers and Scientists, Committees of the National Academy of Sciences Project on Rights and Responsibilities of Users of Computerized Information Networks, and the Project on International Intellectual Property Rights. Mrs. Branscomb died in October, 1997. Her lasting insights into communications law and policy will be published posthumously in Emerging Law in the NetWorld.

Barbara J. Callaway  , Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University, presented “American Values in a Changing World: The Challenge of Opposing Forces” at the 1991 University Symposium, Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness: The American Dream in a Changing World. Professor Callaway received her B.A. degree as valedictorian from Trinity University, San Antonio, and the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Boston University. She also has studied or engaged in research at Harvard University, UCLA, and the University of Nigeria. Professor Callaway is a specialist in African politics, particularly the role of women in African local and national politics. She was a Research Associate at the Institute of African Studies of the University of Nigeria, and she served as Fulbright Professor of Political Science at Bayero University in Kano, Nigeria. She is author of Muslim Hausa Women In Nigeria: Tradition and Change; and The Heritage of Islam: Women, Religion and Change in West Africa. Dr. Callaway has contributed chapters and articles to many edited works on Africa, and to major journals including Africa Report, African Review, Canadian Journal of African Studies, Comparative Politics, and Women and Politics.

Gary Chapman   delivered the featured presentation, “Technology, Jobs, and Inequality: What is the Connection?,” at the 1996 University Symposium American Values in Cyberspace: Issues of the Information Age. Chapman is the Coordinator of The 21st Century Project at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. The 21st Century Project is a program of research and education which is dedicated to expanding public participation in the development of new goals for science and technology policy. Chapman is a research fellow and lecturer at the LBJ School of Public Affairs where he teaches classes on information and telecommunications policy, and science and technology policy. Chapman earned the B.A. degree in political science at Occidental College in Los Angeles and did his post-baccalaureate studies at Stanford University. He has lectured and written extensively in the fields of technology and public policy. He was executive director of the national public interest organization, Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility, from 1984 to 1991. Chapman regularly writes an internationally syndicated newspaper column on technology and society for The Los Angeles Times called “Innovation.” He also covers cyberspace, high tech, and science and technology policy for The New Republic and In These Times magazines. Chapman co-edited the 1987 book, Computers in Battle: Will They Work?, which was selected by the National Computer Press Association as runner-up as Best Computer Book of the Year. He is also co-author of The 21st Century Project: Setting a New Course for Science and Technology Policy, and Guidebook to the Military-Industrial Complex.

Ralph J. Cicerone   was Daniel G. Aldrich, Jr., Professor of Geosciences at the University of California, Irvine, when he presented “The Decreasing Global Ozone Layer and Possible Climate Changes: Human Causes and Responses” at the 1993 University Symposium on American Values and the Environmental Challenge. After earning the B.S. in Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cicerone continued his studies at the University of Illinois where he received the M.S. in Electrical Engineering and the Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Physics. He has held faculty and research positions at the University of Michigan, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. Professor Cicerone is well-known for his pioneering and definitive research and writing in atmospheric chemistry. In 1974, he co-authored a paper in entitled, “Stratospheric Ozone Destruction by Man-Made Chlorofluoromethanes.” The appearance of this article in Science played a significant role in alerting scientist and the general public to the problem of ozone layer destruction. Cicerone is a past Chair of the Committee on Global Change Research at the National Academy of Sciences, and he has served on numerous advisory committees for the Environmental Protection Agency, the Federal Aviation Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. He has appeared frequently to present testimony on environmental issues before various subcommittees of the U.S. Congress. Professor Cicerone has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. He is a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society, the American Association for Advancement of Science, and of the American Geophysical Union. Video recording of Professor Cicerone’s Symposium lecture is available at the Angelo State University Porter Henderson Library, call number VR 2537.

Richard Davis   presented “Virtual Politics: The Internet in U.S. Elections” at the 2000 University Symposium, Constructing Political Candidates: Are We Deconstructing Democracy? Davis is Professor of Government at Brigham Young University. He earned the Ph.D. in American Politics from Syracuse University in 1986. Professor Davis is author or co-author of numerous works, including The Press and American Politics: The New Mediator (3rd edition, 2000), The Web of Politics (1999), The New Media and American Politics (1998), Politics and the Media (1994), and Decisions and Images: The Supreme Court and the Press (1994). His research has been supported by fellowships from Yale University and the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland. He has made numerous scholarly presentations to professional organizations including the American Political Science Association, the International Communication Association, the Political Studies Association (UK), and the Shorenstein Center for the Study of Media and Politics of Harvard University. He was editor for the Political Communications Section of the American Political Science Association Newsletter from 1996-1999.

Richard T. De George   is University Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, of Russian and East European Studies and of Business Administration, and he is Director of the International Center for Ethics at the University of Kansas. As one of the nation’s foremost scholars in the field of business ethics, he participated in the 1985 University Symposium, Perspectives on American Values: Individuals, Corporations, and Morality, delivering a major address, “Corporate Moral Responsibility: The Bophal Incident.” Professor De George completed his university education at Fordham University (B.A.), the Universite de Louvain in Belgium (Ph.B.), and at Yale University (M.A., Ph.D.). He has been a research fellow at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland, at Yale, Columbia, and Stanford Universities, and at the Hoover Institution. He was the Charles J. Dirksen Professor of Business Ethics at Santa Clara University in 1986, and Visiting Professor at the Graduate School of Business, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland, in 1985. Professor De George has written widely in the fields of Marxism and applied ethics, with an emphasis on business ethics. He has authored more than 150 articles, and he is author or editor of 18 books, including The New Marxism; Ethics, Free Enterprise, and Public Policy; Business Ethics, now in its fourth edition and available in both English and Japanese; and Competing With Integrity in International Business. He is a member of the editorial boards of the Business and Professional Ethics Journal and the Journal of Business Ethics. Professor De George is past President of the American Philosophical Association, and current President of the International Society for Business, Economics, and Ethics. In January of 1996, Professor De George was featured in Business Ethics: A European Review, and in November of 1996, he was recognized with an honorary doctorate degree from Nijenrode University, The Netherlands, with Bill Gates of Microsoft Corporation, and President Nelson Mandela of South Africa

Denis P. Doyle   was a featured speaker at the 1988 University Symposium on American Values and the Challenges in Education where he presented “Education and Values: Study, Practice, Example.” He is a Senior Research Fellow at the Hudson Institute, and is widely recognized as an authority in education and educational policy. Before joining the Hudson Institute, Doyle served for five years at the American Enterprise Institute as Director of Education Policy Studies and Human Capital Studies. He also was a Federal Executive Fellow at the Brookings Institution, and has worked at the Heritage Foundation. He holds the B.A. and M.A. degrees in political theory from the University of California at Berkeley. Doyle writes for both scholarly and popular audience publications. His popular articles have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, the Phi Delta Kappan, the Atlantic Monthly, the Wilson Quarterly, and Change magazine . His books on education include, Investing in Our Children: Business and the Public Schools; Winning the Brain Race: A Bold Plan to Make Our Schools Competitive (with David T. Kearns); Reinventing Education: Entrepreneurship in America’s Public Schools (with Louis V. Gerstner); and Where Connoisseurs Send Their Children to School. Doyle’s most recent book is Raising the Standard: An Eight Step Action Guide for Schools and Communities.

D. Stanley Eitzen  , Emeritus Professor of Sociology at Colorado State University, presented “Ethical Dilemmas in American Sport” at the 1995 University Symposium, Sport and American Values. Among Eitzen’s publications are 15 books and monographs, including two prominent and popular works in the field of sport sociology. These are his edited volumes, Sport in Contemporary America: An Anthology; and Sociology of North American Sport. Professor Eitzen has been recognized for his professional service and excellence in social research, scholarship, and creativity on numerous occasions. He was named John N. Stern Distinguished Professor at Colorado State University, and was honored by Bethel College’s Distinguished Achievement Award and Emporia State University’s Distinguished Alumnus Award. Northwestern College in Iowa selected Eitzen as Scholar in Residence in 1987, and Hanover College in Indiana named him to a similar honor in 1992. The Western Social Science Association has honored Dr. Eitzen with its Distinguished Service Award.

Charles A. Endress   is a Professor of European History and Head of the Department of History at Angelo State University. He has been a member of the University Symposium Committee since its inception. He holds a B.A. from Vanderbilt University and the M.A. and Ph.D. from Tulane University. He taught at the United States Military Academy before joining the faculty of Angelo State University in 1969. In 1990 he served as a Visiting Professor of strategy and military history at the United States Air Force Air War College. He is a retired colonel in the United States Army Reserve. While a member of the army reserve, Professor Endress served as a member of the faculty of both the United States Military Academy and the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. During the Gulf War he served as the Deputy Director of the U.S. Army Center of Military History. He is the author of A History of Europe, 1500-1848, and a contributing author to The Whirlwind War: the United States Army in Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm.

Joe B. Frantz   had recently retired from the University of Texas at Austin (Professor Emeritus), and was Turnbull Professor of History at Corpus Christi State University (now Texas A&M, Corpus Christi) when he gave an address on “The Texas Tradition: Its Use and Misuse” at the 1986 University Symposium, Texas Past, Texas Present, & Texas Future. Professor Frantz is distinguished in every aspect of the historical profession. A native Dallasite, he began a half century association with the University of Texas at Austin as an undergraduate journalism major (B.A., 1938) and history student (M.A. 1940; Ph.D., 1948). After a post-doctoral fellowship at Harvard University, Professor Frantz was appointed -to the University of Texas faculty where he taught until 1985 and served as Chair of the Department of History from 1959 to 1965. Professor Frantz held the prestigious Walter Prescott Webb Chair in the History of Ideas at the University of Texas, and he lectured and taught in Switzerland, Germany, Italy, Austria, Hungary, Chile, Peru, Ecuador, and at six universities in Mexico. He was appointed five times as a Fulbright Scholar, and he held visiting professorships at Northwestern University and the Universities of Chicago and Colorado. Professor Frantz’s publications reflect a rich mix of interest in U.S. business history, the history of Texas, and the American West. His doctoral dissertation became a book, Bail Borden, Dairyman to a Nation, and was named the best Texas book of 1951 by the Texas Institute of Letters. He co-authored the widely read book, The American Cowboy: The Myth and the Reality, and Six Thousand Miles of Fence, a History of the XIT Ranch. Professor Frantz’s devotion to the history of Texas and the American West is reflected in his books, Turner, Bolton, and Webb: These Historians of the American Frontier, and The Forty Acre Follies: An Opinionated History of the University of Texas, which in 1984 won the South-western Booksellers Association Award. Professor Frantz served as a consultant in history at the Johnson White House, and he was administrator of the LBJ Oral History Project. Professor Frantz characterized himself as “a historian of the movement of people and ideas.” His final book, The Lure of the Land: Texas County Maps and the History of Settlement was recognized as Best Book of 1988 by both the Texas Historical Commission and the Sons of the Republic of Texas. Professor Frantz died on November 13, 1993, in Houston, Texas.

Peter A. French   was Lennox Distinguished Professor of the Humanities and Professor of Philosophy at Trinity University in San Antonio when he delivered his presentation, “The Virtue of Shame in America: Hester Prynne and the Ford Motor Company,” at the 1984 University Symposium, Perspectives on American Values. He is now the Marie E. and Leslie Cole Chair in Ethics, Professor of Philosophy, Chair of the Department of Philosophy, and Director of The Ethics Center at the University of South Florida. Dr. French has an international reputation in ethical and legal theory, and in collective and corporate responsibility and criminal liability. He is the author of 17 books including Cowboy Metaphysics: Ethics and Death in Westerns; Corporate Ethics; Responsibility Matters; Corporations in the Moral Community; The Spectrum of Responsibility; Collective and Corporate Responsibility; Corrigible Corporations and Unruly Laws; Ethics in Government; and The Scope of Morality. He is the senior editor of Midwest Studies in Philosophy, editor of the Journal of Social Philosophy, and was general editor of the Issues in Contemporary Ethics series. His Ph.D. is from the University of Miami, with considerable post-graduate work at Oxford University, England.

Robert V. Friedenberg   presented ” The Ballot Box Wars: Political Campaign Communication and the Future of American Democracy ” at the 2000 University Symposium, Constructing Political Candidates: Are We Deconstructing Democracy? Dr. Friedenberg is Professor of Communication at Miami (Ohio) University, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1970. He is the author, co-author, or editor of five books, including Political Campaign Communication: Principles and Practices (4th edition, 2000), Communications Consultants in Political Campaigns: The Ballot Box Warriors (1997), Rhetorical Studies of National Political Debates (3rd edition, 1997), Theodore Roosevelt and the Rhetoric of Militant Decency (1990), and Hear 0 ‘Israel: The History of American Jewish Preaching (1989). In addition to his research and writing, Dr. Friedenberg has been active as a political consultant. He has worked in over 70 campaigns ranging from local school level campaigns to the top of the ballot. He has written for one American President, several members of the United States Senate and House of Representatives, and a host of other office holders and candidates. He has served as a communications consultant for the Republican National Committee, worked with the commission on Presidential Debates, and spoken at meetings of the American Association of Political Consultants. He has served as an expert commentator on political debates and other aspects of political communication for a wide variety of media outlets and as a communications consultant to several major American businesses. He has also spoken on aspects of political campaign communications at a wide variety of academic institutions including the University of Maryland, the University of Virginia, Lamar University, Indiana University, Marshall University, Clarkson College, Ball State University, and the University of Cincinnati. He has been a member of the editorial boards or a referee for nine academic journals and has received awards for innovative teaching from Miami University and the Central States Speech Association.

James L. Gumnick  , former Executive Director for Research at the St. Francis Regional Medical Center in Wichita, Kansas, provided the featured lecture, “What is it all for?,” at the 1990 University Symposium, American Values and the Frontiers of Science and Technology. A graduate of Loyola College in Baltimore, Maryland, and the University of Notre Dame, Dr. Gumnick is a distinguished leader, organizer and manager of cooperative scientific research and technology development programs. In addition to his service at St. Francis Regional Medical Center, he has provided leadership in scientific research and technology development at such organizations as Martin Marietta Corporation, International Telephone and Telegraph Industrial Laboratories, The Franklin Institute Research Laboratories, the University City Science Center, the University of Houston, the Gulf University Research Consortium, and Oak Ridge Associated Universities.

David E. Hayes-Bautista   was Professor of Medicine and Director of the Chicano Studies Research Center at the University of California, Los Angeles, when he presented “The Urban Underclass and Latinos: From Stereotype to Social Policy” at the 1992 University Symposium, American Values and the “Urban Underclass”: A Clash of Cultures? Professor Hayes-Bautista received his B.A. degree in sociology at the University of California, Berkeley, and earned the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at the University of California Medical Center in San Francisco. Before his work at UCLA, he taught at the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley. He is author or coauthor of a number of books and monographs including Health Care for the Urban Poor: Directions for Policy; No Longer a Minority: Latinos and Social Policy in California; The Burden of Support: Young Latinos in an Aging Society; and Redefining California: Latino Social Engagement in a Multicultural Society. Video recording of Professor Hayes-Bautista’s Symposium lecture is available at the Angelo State University Porter Henderson Library, call number VR 2382.

Jared E. Hazleton   was President of the Texas Research League, a nonprofit educational corporation engaged in objective analyses of the operations, programs and problems of Texas government, when he participated in the 1986 University Symposium, Texas Past, Texas Present, & Texas Future. Now serving as Director of the Center for Business and Economic Analysis in the Lowry Mays College and Graduate School of Business at Texas A&M University, Dr. Hazleton presented “Texas at the Turning Point.” Born in Oklahoma City, Dr. Hazleton earned a B.B.A. degree in accounting from the University of Oklahoma in 1959, and the Ph.D. degree in economics from Rice University in 1965. He served on the faculty in economics at the University of Texas at Austin, and became a founding member of the faculty of the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas in 1970. Dr. Hazleton was named Dean of the Graduate School of Public Affairs of the University of Washington in 1980, and returned to Texas in 1982 as President of the Texas Research League. Dr. Hazleton has published on a wide range of public policy subjects. His articles appear frequently in scholarly and professional journals, and he has served as a member of the editorial boards of Texas Business Review and Policy Analysis.

Anne L. Heald   was Executive Director of the Center for Learning and Competitiveness in the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland when she delivered her lecture, “The Value of Education Excellence for All in Meeting Global Competition and in Maintaining a Democratic Society,” at the 1994 University Symposium on American Values and the Nation’s Competitiveness in a Global Economy. Ms. Heald is now working as a private consultant. She earned the B.A. degree in Political Science at Colorado College and the M.A. degree in City and Regional Planning at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. She served as Executive Assistant to the Mayor of New Orleans where she coordinated city project directors who worked in the fields of health, housing, drug and alcohol abuse, and crime prevention. She later founded and served as Program Director of the Indochina Refugee Action Center in Washington, D.C., and was Program Officer for the German Marshall Fund of the United States where she directed the Program on Improving U.S. Competitiveness: Workforce Preparation and Small Group Assistance. At the University of Maryland’s Center for Learning and Competitiveness, Ms. Heald directed an educational organization dedicated to improving the competitiveness of American firms and workers by identifying and applying relevant international policies and practices to workforce development in the United States. Ms. Heald’s expertise in the international transfer of worker education and youth apprenticeship programs has led to numerous speaking engagements across the United States and abroad. She has addressed business and education groups in Salzburg, Austria; Copenhagen, Denmark; and in the United Kingdom. She also has spoken to the annual meetings of the National Alliance of Business, the National Association of State Boards of Education, and the National Conference of State Legislatures. She has served as a member of the Technical Planning Group on World Class Standards for the National Goals Panel on Education, and on the Advisory Panel of the National Youth Apprenticeship Initiative. She also was a member of the Advisory Committee for “Challenge to America,” a PBS series which examined global economic competition between the United States and other countries with different cultures, educational systems, and business strategies.

Arnold R. Hirsch  , Professor of History at the University of New Orleans, delivered the featured lecture, “Historical Perspectives on the American ‘Underclass,’” at the 1992 University Symposium, American Values and the “Urban Underclass.” Professor Hirsch earned the B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of New Orleans, he taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago and at the University of Michigan. He was also Visiting Associate Professor at Harvard University. Professor Hirsch is an active scholar who works on a variety of issues related to urban history. He is the author of Making the Second Ghetto: Race and Housing in Chicago, 1940-1960; and he has co-edited Creole New Orleans: Race and Americanization; and Urban Policy in Twentieth-Century America. He has written many articles, essays, and book reviews which have been published in major professional journals such as the American Historical Review, The Journal of American History, The Journal of Urban History, Reviews in American History, and The Journal of Southern History. Professor Hirsch has lectured in several programs sponsored by the W.E.B. DuBois Institute and by the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He also has lectured at universities in Austria, Germany, and the Netherlands.

Michael A. Hitt  , Professor of Management and the Paul M. and Rosalie Robertson Chair in Business Administration at Texas A&M University, presented “The Strategic Competitiveness of U.S. Firms in the Global Marketplace” at the 1994 University Symposium on American Values and the Nation’s Competitiveness in a Global Economy. A graduate of Texas Tech University with the B.B.A. and M.B.A. degrees, Hitt earned the Ph.D. degree at the University of Colorado. For the past quarter century, Dr. Hitt has compiled an impressive record as teacher, scholar, editor, business consultant, and university leader. Hitt has held academic appointments at the University of Colorado, Oklahoma State University, and the University of Texas at Arlington. In addition to these academic appointments, Professor Hitt has been a Visiting Scholar at 20 other colleges and universities, including: Dartmouth College; Northwestern University; University of North Carolina; and the University of British Columbia. Dr. Hitt has co-authored ten books and numerous journal articles. Among his recent books are Insights: Readings in Strategic Management, and Downscoping: How To Tame the Diversified Firm.

E. James Holland   is Dean of the College of Liberal and Fine Arts at Angelo State University. He joined the ASU government faculty in 1967 and has served in various positions, including Head of the Department of Government and Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs. He holds the B.A. degree from Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas, the B.D. degree from Yale University Divinity School, and the Ph.D. degree in international relations from American University in Washington, D.C. Professor Holland teaches in the areas of international relations and U.S. foreign policy. He has been instrumental in developing and conducting several special academic programs at Angelo State University. He was Program Director of the West Texas Conference on State Affairs from 1975 to 1982, and he is currently Chair of the University Committee on International Education, as well as the Academic Administrative Liaison for the West Texas Utilities Distinguished Visiting Faculty Program. Professor Holland chaired the University Symposium Committee from 1984 until 1995, and he continues to serve as a committee member for the University Symposium on American Values.

James Davison Hunter   is a prominent student of social change in contemporary America. His article, “A Profile of America’s Youth,” was the basis of his featured presentation at the 1997 University Symposium, Youth, American Values, and the American Dream. Since 1994, he has held the position of William R. Kenan Professor of Sociology and Religious Studies at the University of Virginia. Hunter also is the Director and Principal Investigator of The Post-Modernity Project. He is author of several books which have earned him national recognition and numerous literary awards. In 1988, he received the Distinguished Book Award from the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion for Evangelicalism: The Coming Generation. His book, Culture Wars: The Struggle to Define America, was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times 1992 Book Prize and won the 1992 Critics-Choice Award from Christianity Today. Professor Hunter’s numerous academic articles have appeared in such journals as Social Research and Comparative Studies in Society and History, and his popular essays have appeared in The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post.

Elizabeth Johns   gave the paper, “The Arts and American Values: Wholeness and Diversity,” at the 1989 University Symposium on The Arts and American Values. She is Professor of the History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania, where she holds the Silfen Term Chair in the History of Art. Johns studied as an undergraduate first at Oberlin College in Ohio and then at Birmingham Southern College where she received the B.A. degree. She earned an M.A. degree in literature at the University of California, Berkeley, and earned her doctorate at Emory University studying in the Graduate Institute of Liberal Arts. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania, Professor Johns taught at Albany State College in Georgia, Savannah State College, the University of Maryland, and the University of Pittsburgh where she was Andrew Mellon Professor of Fine Arts and History. Best known for her studies of American paintings, Professor Johns’ expertise ranges across the arts from literature to music. Her first book, Thomas Eakins: The Heroism of Modern Life, won the 1984 Mitchell Prize in the History of Art. Professor Johns also is author of American Genre Painting: The Politics of Everyday Life, and her articles have appeared widely in significant scholarly journals, including The Wilson Quarterly; Journal of Interdisciplinary History; American Studies International; and the American Art Journal.

Steve Jones  , Professor and Head of the Department of Communication at the University of Illinois at Chicago, presented “The Internet and the Social, or: Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Progress,” at the 1996 University Symposium, American Values in Cyberspace: Issues of the Information Age. Professor Jones is formerly Chair of the Faculty of Communication at the University of Tulsa, where he also served as Co-Director of the Center for Research on Information, Technology and Society. Jones earned the Ph.D. degree in communication from the University of Illinois, and also holds the M.S. and B.S. degrees from that institution. Jones has written extensively on a broad range of topics associated with the revolution in information technology and telecommunications and its social, legal and commercial effects. He has authored or edited several books in the field including CyberSociety: Computer-Mediated Communication and Community and Virtual Culture. Professor Jones also is Editor of New Media & Society, and serves as an Editorial Board Member for Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication.

Michael W. Kirst   was Professor of Education and Chair of the Department of Administration and Policy Analysis at Stanford University when he delivered the featured lecture, “Cycles of Education Reform: What Reforms Last with Implications for Texas Education,” at the 1988 University Symposium on American Values and the Challenges in Education. He holds the A.B. degree in economics from Dartmouth College and the M.P.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics and government from Harvard University. He has served on the National Advisory Council on Education of Disadvantaged Children and was Associate Director of the President’s Commission on White House Fellows. Professor Kirst has also worked at the U.S. Office of Education, and was Staff Director for the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Manpower, Employment and Poverty. He is author or coauthor of several books, including Schools in Conflict: Political Turbulence in American Education; Contemporary Issues in Education: Perspectives from Australia and U.S.A.; and Who Controls Our Schools: American Values in Conflict. Video recording of Professor Kirst’s Symposium lecture is available at the Angelo State University Porter Henderson Library, call number VR 1555.

Wayne P. Lawson   presented a featured lecture on “The State of the Arts in Contemporary America” at the 1989 University Symposium, The Arts and American Values. Dr. Lawson is Executive Director of the Ohio Arts Council in Columbus, Ohio. He previously served as Director of the Ohio Foundation on the Arts, and as Chair of Comparative Literature at Ohio State University. He holds baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral degrees from Ohio State University. At the Ohio Arts Council, Lawson’s effective leadership for two decades has helped make it an agency regarded by many as one of the nation’s leading state arts organizations providing and pro-moting funding, planning, and services for artists, arts educators, arts administrators, and art constituents. His leadership in the arts also extends to the national arena where he has served as Chair of the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies and is active with the National Endowment for the Arts. At the National Endowment, Lawson was a member of the Advisory Committee for the Report on Arts Education, Toward Civilization, and he has chaired several of the organization’s national panels and committees.

James M. McCormick  , Professor of Political Science at Iowa State University, delivered the featured lecture, “American Values and Beliefs in the New World Order,” at the 1991 University Symposium, Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness: The American Dream in a Changing World. A Wisconsin native, Professor McCormick earned the B.A. degree at Aquinas College, Michigan, and the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at Michigan State University. Before joining the Iowa State University faculty, McCormick taught as a visiting professor at the University of New Mexico, Ohio University, and Texas A&M University. He was a member of the faculty at The University of Toledo. Professor McCormick has been recognized widely for his research on international and foreign policy topics. He has served as a Congressional Fellow representing the American Political Science Association and as a guest scholar at The Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. His publications include American Foreign Policy and Process, a leading college level text which was published in its third edition in 1998. Numerous articles authored by McCormick on a broad range of international relations and foreign policy topics have appeared in leading journals such as the American Journal of Political Science, the American Political Science Review, Foreign Policy, The Journal of Politics, Legislative Studies Quarterly, and World Politics.

William H. McNeill   is one of America’s eminent historians who can truly be said to have helped shape the consciousness of the 20th century. He received the B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of Chicago and earned the Ph.D. from Cornell University. He was the Robert A. Millikan Distinguished Service Professor of History at the University of Chicago when he delivered the featured lecture on “The Frontier and American Values” at the 1984 University Symposium, Perspectives on American Values. The major themes of Professor McNeill’s presentation can be found in his book, The Great Frontier: Freedom and Hierarchy in Modern Times. Among his other distinguished works, which have been translated into eight languages in many editions, are The Rise of the West, for which he received the National Book Award for 1964, A World History, Venice: The Hinge of Europe, 1081-1797, and Plagues and Peoples.

Carlos Muñoz  , Jr. presented “The New American Identity: A Challenge for Multiracial Democracy in the 21st Century” at the 1999 University Symposium , Looking for America: Unity and Diversity in the 21st Century. He was born in the “segundo barrio” in El Paso, Texas, and raised in the barrios of East Los Angeles, California. He is the son of poor working class Mexican immigrants. He retired as full professor in the Department of Ethnic Studies, University of California Berkeley after 31 years of teaching in higher education. He has gained international prominence as political scientist, historian, essayist, and public intellectual. Dr. Muñoz was the founding chair of the first Mexican American Studies department in the nation in 1968 at the California State University at Los Angeles and the founding chair of the National Association of Chicana & Chicano Studies (NACCS). He has authored numerous pioneering works on the Mexican American political experience and on African American and Latino political coalitions. His book, Youth, Identity, Power:The Chicano Movement, won the Gustavus Myers Book Award for “outstanding scholarship in the study of human rights in the Untied States.” The book is in its 7th printing and was a major resource for the 1996 PBS television series, “Chicano!: History of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement.” Dr. Muñoz was the senior consultant for the project and was also featured in the series. He has also been featured in several other documentary films. He is currently working on two new books: Multiracial Democracy or Apartheid: America’s Choice for the 21st Century, and a biography on The Life & Times of Dr. Ernesto Galarza (1908-1984) who was the first Mexican American nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Walter F. Murphy   was McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence at Princeton University when he presented “The Constitution and the Court” at the 1987 University Symposium, We the People, Constitutional Ideals and the American Experience: A Bicentennial Perspective. Professor Murphy is co-author of one of the most widely used textbooks in the collegiate study of government in the United States, American Democracy. He earned the A.B. degree at the University of Notre Dame, the M.A. degree at George Washington University, and the Ph.D. degree at the University of Chicago. He has taught at the U.S. Naval Academy, the U.S. Marine Corps Command and Staff College, and at the European University Institute. A noted novelist, Professor Murphy was the recipient of the Chicago Foundation for Literature Award for The Vicar of Christ. His academic writings have earned him recognition as one of America’s foremost constitutional scholars. He has written Congress and the Court; the classic, Elements of Judicial Strategy; and Wiretapping on Trial. He is coauthor or coeditor of The Study of Public Law; Comparative Constitutional Law; and American Constitutional Interpretation. Video recording of Professor Murphy’s Symposium lecture is available at the Angelo State University Porter Henderson Library, call number VR 1553.

Mimi Murray   presented “Right on Sophocles!” at the 1995 University Symposium on Sport and American Values. She is the Buxton Professor of Physical Education at Springfield College in Massachusetts, and a national leader in the fields of sport psychology and women’s sports. Professor Murray earned the B.S. and M.S. degrees at Springfield College, and completed the Ph.D. at the University of Connecticut. During her tenure as head coach for women’s gymnastics at Springfield College, Professor Murray’s teams won three national intercollegiate championships. She also coached the United States women’s gymnastics team for the World University Games in Moscow in 1973, and she has served on the Board of Directors of the United States Gymnastics Federation. She has worked as a consultant with various university athletic departments, U.S. Olympic teams, and professional athletes, and she has appeared as an expert commentator on gymnastics for both the ABC and NBC networks. She is author of Gymnastics for Women: The Spectator, Gymnast, Coach, and Teacher, and she has written numerous articles for scholarly journals, professional newsletters, and edited book collections in the field of sport psychology. Professor Murray has been recognized as the “Person of the Year” by the National Organization for Women, and the Women’s Sport Foundation has named her a “Pioneer for Girls and Women in Sports.” In 1993, Professor Murray was inducted into the Springfield College Athletic Hall of Fame.

Samuel L. Myers  , Jr. is Roy Wilkins Professor of Human Relations and Social Justice at the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, the University of Minnesota. Professor Myers delivered the featured lecture, “The Rich Get Richer and …The Problem of Race and Inequality in the 1990’s,” at the 1992 University Symposium, American Values and the “Urban Underclass”: A Clash of Cultures? Myers earned the B.A. degree in economics magna cum laude from Morgan State University in Baltimore and the Ph.D. degree in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was a Fulbright Lecturer at Cuttington University College in Liberia, West Africa, and has worked as a consultant to the Baltimore Urban League, the National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, the U.S. General Accounting Office and the U.S. Congressional Committee on the Judiciary. In 1990, Myers was recognized by the Review of Black Political Economy as one of the top 20 U.S. black economists. In 1997, he received his second Fulbright Scholarship to lecture in the University of South Australia’s Aboriginal and Islander Studies program. His research and writing have examined the subjects of racism, poverty, family structures, crime and the criminal justice system, welfare dependency, the marginalization of black males, and entrepreneurship among African Americans. Myers has authored, co-authored, or co-edited many books and monographs, including Employment Opportunities and Crime; Economics of Race and Crime; Crime and the Black Community: Issues in the Understanding of Race and Crime in America; Desegregation in Higher Education; The Black Underclass: Critical Essays on Race and Unwantedness; and Civil Rights and Race Relations in the Post Reagan-Bush Era.

Angela M.S. Nelson   presented “Popular Culture: What Everyone Needs to Know” at the 1998 University Symposium, Eye on The Media: American Values, The Media, and Popular Culture. She is Assistant Professor of Popular Culture and Director of the Center for Popular Culture Studies at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. Professor Nelson is editor of a forthcoming book, This Is How We Flow: Rhythm in Black Cultures, which is scheduled for publication in the fall of 1998. She also has written chapters for several edited volumes including The Triumph of the Soul: Cultural and Psychological Aspects of African-American Music, edited by Ferdinand Jones and Arthur C. Jones; Cultural Diversity and the U.S. Media, edited by Yahya R. Kamalipour and Theresa Carilli; Generations: Academic Feminists in Dialogue, edited by Devoney Looser and E. Ann Kaplan; and Popular Culture: An Introductory Text, edited by Jack Nachbar and Kevin Lause.

Grace Palladino   presented the featured presentation, “Adolescent Dreams, Adult Anxieties: Whose Future Is It, Anyhow?,” at the 1997 University Symposium on Youth, American Values, and the American Dream. Dr. Palladino is Co-director and Editor of The Samuel Gompers Papers at the University of Maryland, College Park. She has been instrumental in preserving the writings of the great American labor leader in the multi-volume set, The Samuel Gompers Papers, published by the University of Illinois Press. In 1991, Dr. Palladino’s book, Another Civil War: Labor, Capital, and the State in the Anthracite Regions of Pennsylvania, 1840-68, won the Organization of American Historians Avery Craven Prize for the most original book on the Civil War. Her historical study of youth in American Teenagers: An American History, was published in 1996. In this book, Palladino investigates the history of adolescence in America from the rise of bobbysoxers, to the dawn of rock ‘n’ roll, to the emergence of today’s teenagers. Her work on the history of youth in America has extended into the realm of film. She is currently working on a project to produce a documentary series on the history of teenagers.

Robert Perrucci  , Professor of Sociology at Purdue University, delivered the featured lecture, “The Changing Global Economy and the Challenge to American Values,” at the 1994 University Symposium on American Values and the Nation’s Competitiveness in a Global Economy. A native New Yorker, Perrucci earned the B.A. degree in Education at the State University of New York, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Sociology at Purdue University. He remained at Purdue as a member of the faculty, becoming a full professor in 1967. Professor Perrucci’s scholarly interests include the interaction between technology and society, work and occupations, complex organizations, and social stratification. His current research examines the impact of the changing global economy on local communities. He has authored or edited numerous works, including Japanese Auto Transplants in the Heartland: Corporatism and Community and The New American Class Structure.

Benjamin G. Rader  , the James L. Sellers Professor of History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, presented the featured lecture, “Sports and Fraternity: A Role for Sports in Our Trying Time,” at the 1995 University Symposium on Sport and American Values. Professor Rader has written several books and numerous journal articles dealing with history and sports. His book, American Sports: From the Age of Folk Games to the Age of Spectators, was first published in 1982, is now in its third edition and has been translated into German and Japanese. Rader is also author of In Its Own Image: How Television Has Transformed Sports; Baseball: A History of America s Game; and Batter Up: The Universe of Baseball. In 1983, one of Professor Rader’s many journal articles, “Compensatory Sport Heroes: Ruth, Grange, and Dempsey,” won the Russel Nye Award for the best essay of the year in Journal of Popular Culture. He has been selected to deliver special addresses and lectures for many university and professional conferences, including the Bruce L. Bennett Lecture at Ohio State University in 1985, the John R. Betts Honorary Address for the North American Association of Sport Historians in 1990, and the keynote address for the Sports and Media Conference at Super Bowl XXVIII in Atlanta, 1994.

Deborah L. Rhode   presented the featured lecture, “Constitutional Celebrations: Women’s Rights, Women’s Roles, and the View From the Margins,” at the 1987 University Symposium, We the People, Constitutional Ideals and the American Experience: A Bicentennial Perspective. She is the Ernest W. McFarland Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and the former Director of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender at Stanford. Also at Stanford, she is founder of the Keck Center on Legal Ethics and the Legal Profession, and has been distinguished as the Bernard D. Bergreen Scholar. She is now President of the Association of American Law Schools. A member of the Stanford Law faculty since 1979, Professor Rhode’s scholarship and teaching focus on professional responsibility and gender discrimination. She is the recipient of a 1997 Emma Award from the National Women’s Political Caucus for her National Law Journal columns on equal rights. She holds B.A. and J.D. degrees from Yale University, and has served as a member of the Board of Trustees at Yale. She was Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard, Columbia, and New York University. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, Professor Rhode was law clerk for former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. Professor Rhode is author, co-author or editor of numerous publications in her field, including Professional Responsibility: Ethics by the Pervasive Method; Speaking of Sex: The Denial of Gender Inequality; Sex Discrimination and the Law: History, Practice and Theory; Legal Ethics; The Legal Profession: Responsibility and Regulation; The Politics of Pregnancy: Adolescent Sexuality and Public Policy; Theoretical Perspectives on Sexual Difference; and Justice and Gender.

William E. Riebsame  , Associate Professor of Geography at the University of Colorado at Boulder, presented the featured lecture, “Life in Paradox Valley: Values, Environment and Development in the American West,” at the 1993 University Symposium on American Values and the Environmental Challenge. Professor Riebsame earned baccalaureate and master’s degrees in geography from Florida State University and the University of Utah respectively. He received the Ph.D. degree from Clark University, where his doctoral research focused on the ways dryland farmers on the Great Plains cope with environmental hazards. The recipient of an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship, Riebsame has continued study of the interaction of social systems and climate changes, a subject central to his research activities even today. The author or co-author of a number of writings, his Assessing the Social Implications of Climate Fluctuations: A Guide to Climate Impact Studies, was first published by the United Nations Environment Programme in 1988 and is now in its second edition including translations in Spanish and Chinese. Riebsame co-authored Drought and Natural Resources Management in the United States. He is editor of Atlas of the New West: Portrait of a Changing Region. Professor Riebsame’s expertise on societal adaptations to climate changes is known widely by scientists, public officials, and land users. He has addressed the World Meteorological Organization Technical Conference on the African Climate in Arusha, Tanzania, the International Symposium on Climate and Food Security in New Delhi, India, and the Second World Climate Conference in Geneva, Switzerland. His latest work on land use change in the Western United States has attracted attention in federal, state, and local agencies.

Michael R. Rion   was President of Hartford Seminary in Hartford, Connecticut, when he spoke on “Ethics and Management in the Corporate Arena” at the 1985 University Symposium, Perspectives on American Values: Individuals, Corporations, and Morality. He is now a consultant on ethical and managerial issues to some of the nation’s foremost corporations. He earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from Northwestern University, and holds professional and graduate degrees (M. Div., Ph.D.) from Yale University. Professor Rion has had extensive experience in coping with the practical issues of ethics with business managers. From 1979 to 1983, Rion served as Director of Corporate Responsibility of the Cummins Engine Company, the world’s largest independent producer of diesel engines, and a company recognized as a leader in the corporate social responsibility movement. He has written many articles on the practical aspects of ethical conduct in business and industry, and he is author of The Responsible Manager.

Barry Rubin   was Professorial Lecturer in International Affairs at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies when he presented “Portrait of a World Turned Upside Down” at the 1991 University Symposium, Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness: The American Dream in a Changing World. Rubin earned the B.A. degree at Richmond College, the M.A. degree from Rutgers University, and the Ph.D. from Georgetown University. He was a Senior Fellow in Middle East Studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and has served as a foreign policy staff member in the United States Senate. Rubin is the author of Paved with Good Intentions: The American Experience and Iran; Secrets of State: The State Department and The Struggle Over U.S. Foreign Policy; The Arab States and the Palestine Conflict; and Revolution Until Victory: The Politics of the PLO. Video recording of Dr. Rubin’s Symposium lecture is available at the Angelo State University Porter Henderson Library, call number VR 1945.

George K. Schweitzer  , Alumni Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at The University of Tennessee in Knoxville, presented “Modern Technology and American Values”” at the 1990 University Symposium on American Values and the Frontiers of Science and Technology. He earned degrees in chemistry from Central College, Missouri (B.A.), and from the University of Illinois (M.S. and Ph.D.). As a faculty fellow at Columbia University, Dr. Schweitzer pursued further graduate studies in philosophy at Columbia (M.A.) and New York University (Ph.D.). He received an honorary Doctor of Science (Sc.D.) degree from Central College for his work in the history of science. Schweitzer has served as a scientific consultant to many academic, industrial, and government organizations, including the Atomic Energy Commission, the U.S. Army Radiological Defense Laboratories, Monsanto, Proctor and Gamble, and Union Carbide. He regularly engages in research and consults with several of the facilities at the Oak Ridge Laboratories in Tennessee. He has written extensively and lectured at over 400 college and university campuses across the nation on the interrelations of science, philosophy, and religion.

Daniel S. Simberloff   was the Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Biological Science at Florida State University when he delivered the featured lecture, “Habitat Change, Population Growth, and the Biodiversity Crisis: Getting Ahead of the Extinction Curve,” at the 1993 University Symposium, American Values and the Environmental Challenge. He has recently joined the faculty of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville as the Nancy Gore Hunger Professor. A Pennsylvania native, Professor Simberloff earned Ph.D. in biology from Harvard University. He has served as visiting professor at a number of institutions, both in the United States and abroad, including the Universities of Michigan, Minnesota Miami, and North Carolina-Greensboro, Wichita State University, the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and the Université de Science et Technologie de Languedoc (France). Professor Simberloff also has lectured at many colleges, universities, and scientific institutes around the world, including the University of Texas at Austin and Texas Tech University, the University of Sydney, Cambridge University, the Soviet Academy of Sciences in Moscow and St. Petersburg, the Université de Lausanne, and McGill University, Georgetown University, Acadia University, and Tel Aviv University. Professor Simberloff’s extensive research and writing on topics related to biodiversity, ecology, and the environment have established him as one of the nation’s foremost authorities. His most recent work is Strangers in Paradise: Impact and Management of Nonindigenous Species in Florida.

Lynn Spigel   is Professor in the Critical Studies Division of the School of Cinema-Television at the University of Southern California. She presented “The Rise of Television and its Audience: Reception History as Cultural History” at the 1998 University Symposium, Eye on The Media: American Values, The Media, and Popular Culture. Professor Spigel has lectured on matters relating to the motion picture and television media at numerous institutions including The Whitney Museum of Modern Art, The Princeton School of Architecture, and The Smithsonian Institute, as well as many universities in the United States and overseas. The acclaimed book by Professor Spigel, Make Room for TV: Television and the Family Ideal in Postwar America, has been called “Absolutely brilliant” by Signs; “fascinating” by Women’s Review of Books; “Excellent cultural history” by Contemporary Sociology; “provocative and important” by American Studies; and “the most lucid and convincing argument for tracing television’s impact” by The Australian Journal of American Studies. Professor Spigel is currently writing High Culture in Low Places: Modern Art and Commercial Television, 1950-1970.

Kenneth L. Stewart   is Professor of Sociology and University Studies at Angelo State University and was the 1998-1999 Chair of the University Symposium Committee which plans and organizes the University Symposium on American Values. He earned the B.A. degree at Boise State University (Idaho), and completed the M.A. degree at Colorado State University and the Ph.D. at Western Michigan University. He is Editor of the print volume, The Angelo State University Symposium on American Values, 1984-1997, and he is editor of materials maintained in this archive of Symposium papers. His book, Not Room Enough: Mexicans, Anglos, and Socioeconomic Change in Texas, 1850-1900, written with Arnoldo De Leon, was recognized by Choice as one of the “Best Academic Books” for 1994, and his textbook, Race and Ethnic Relations in America: An Introduction Using MicroCase. was recognized by the American Sociological Association in 1998 for “Outstanding Contributions to Computing in Sociology Instruction.” Other books and monographs authored or coauthored by Professor Stewart are The San Angelo Area Survey for 1984: Value Orientations in the Local Community and Tejanos and The Numbers Game: A Socio-Historical Interpretation from the Federal Censuses, 1850-1900.

William Strauss   delivered the featured presentation, “What Future Awaits Today’s Youth in the New Millennium?,” at the 1997 University Symposium on Youth, American Values, and the American Dream. Strauss is a writer, historian, lecturer, theatrical director, and entertainer. He is a graduate of Harvard College, Harvard Law School, and the John F. Kennedy School of Government, where he received degrees in economics, law and public policy. In the late 1960s, Strauss founded a national college placement organization for low-income and minority students. Later, he worked on the staff of President Ford’s Clemency Board, which led to his first two books, Reconciliation After Vietnam and Chance and Circumstance: The Draft, the War, and the Vietnam Generation. In 1986, Strauss and co-author Neil Howe began writing Generations. The History of America’s Future, 1584-2069, which presented biographies of the 18 generations of Americans from the first Puritans to the young children of the 1990s. The second book co-authored by Strauss and Howe, 13th-Gen: Abort, Retry, Ignore, Fail?, dealt with Americans who were born in the 1960s and 1970s. A third book, The Fourth Turning, turns history into prophecy by forecasting an epic crisis facing America’s youth in the early years of the 21st century.

Judith P. Swazey   is President of the Acadia Institute, an independent, nonprofit center that does interdisciplinary research and education programs on issues concerning medicine, science, and society. Dr. Swazey delivered the featured address, “We Shall Overcome, Somehow: Biomedicine, Health, and American Values,” at the 1990 University Symposium on American Values and the Frontiers of Science and Technology. A New York native, Dr. Swazey earned the B.A. degree from Wellesley College and the Ph.D. degree in the History of Science from Harvard University. Her career has been devoted to research, writing, and teaching focused on the social, legal, ethical, and policy aspects of biomedical research and health care. She has served as a research associate, lecturer, and research fellow in Harvard’s History of Science Department, as a member of the faculty at Boston University in the Schools of Medicine and Public Health, and as President of the College of the Atlantic. Her publications include 12 books and over 50 articles which treat a variety of topics in scientific research and ethical issues in medical practice and health care systems, and in graduate and professional education. Both the American Sociological Association and the American Medical Writers Association have given special recognition to Dr. Swazey’s book, The Courage to Fail. A Social View of Organ Transplants and Hemodialysis, which she co-authored with Ren”e C. Fox. Her most recent work, also co-authored with Ren”e Fox and Judith Watkins, is Spare Parts: Organ Replacement in American Society.

Patricia H. Werhane   was Professor of Philosophy at Loyola University of Chicago when she gave a featured address on “Individual Moral Responsibility in Business: Moral Dilemmas of Business Persons” at the 1985 University Symposium, Perspectives on American Values: Individuals, Corporations, and Morality. She is now Ruffin Professor of Business Ethics at The Darden Graduate School of Business Administration, The University of Virginia. A graduate of Wellesley College (B.A.), she completed graduate study in philosophy at Northwestern University where she earned the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. She also has been a Rockefeller Fellow at the Ethics Institute of Dartmouth College and an Arthur Andersen Visiting Scholar at Cambridge University (England). Professor Werhane is author or co-author of a number of books, including Moral Imagination and Management Decision Making; Ethical Issues in Business, 5th edition; and Persons, Rights, and Corporations. Her articles have appeared in such scholarly periodicals as the Journal of Value Inquiry, Applied Philosophy, Idealistic Studies, and Theoretical Medicine. She is now Editor-in-Chief of Business Ethics Quarterly.

Arthur E. Wise   was Director of the Center for the Study of the Teaching Profession at The RAND Corporation when gave the featured lecture, “American Values and the Teacher,” at the 1988 University Symposium on American Values and the Challenges in Education. Wise is an honor graduate of Harvard College and holds the M.B.A. degree and the Ph.D. degree in educational administration from the University of Chicago. Wise’s professional career has been devoted to research in education and to public and private efforts to reform and strengthen the teaching profession and the educational enterprise. He has been Associate Director of Research with New England Education Data Systems and an Associate at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He has held positions at the United States Military Academy at West Point, he was Associate Dean of the Graduate School of Education at the University of Chicago, and he is formerly the Associate Director of the National Institute of Education, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. He served as a consultant to President Carter’s executive branch Reorganization Project which resulted in the creation of the U.S. Department of Education. Wise is the author of Rich Schools, Poor Schools: The Promise of Educational Opportunity, the 1968 book which provided major impetus for the school finance reform movement in America. He is also author of Legislated Learning: The Bureaucratization of the American Classroom. Video recording of Dr. Wise’s Symposium lecture is available at the Angelo State University Porter Henderson Library, call number VR 1555.

Alan Wolfe  is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for Religion and American Public Life at Boston College. At the 1999 University Symposium , Looking for America: Unity and Diversity in the 21st Century, Dr. Wolfe delivered the presentation, “Is America Losing Its Virtue?” He is the author or editor or more than ten books including Marginalized in the Middle (University of Chicago Press, 1997). His book, One Nation, After All (Viking Penguin, 1998), received wide attention for demonstrating that middle-class Americans who believe in such moral values as right and wrong tend to apply these standards to their own conduct while remaining relatively non-judgmental with respect to others. A contributing editor for The New Republic and The Wilson Quarterly, Professor Wolfe writes often for these publications, as well as for Commonweal, The New York Times, Harper’s, and The Washington Post. Professor Wolfe has been a Fulbright Professor of American Studies at the University of Copenhagen, and he has lectured widely at American and European universities.