I am an Assistant Professor at Angelo State University. I received my PhD in U.S. history from the University of Wisconsin in 2012. My research interests focus on the intersection of the cultural and political history of the United States, particularly during the twentieth century. I teach courses about U.S. history, crime and violence, Globalization, and American politics and social movements. For more information about my courses, click here.

My manuscript, In the Crucible of Violence: The Remaking of American Political Culture in the 1960s and 1970s, examines popular and political responses to violence during the 1960s and 1970s on both the local and national levels. It uses these sources to show the effects of public anxiety about a seemingly new violence problem on U.S. policy, society, and political culture. For more information about my project, see the research tab. A portion of this research has also been published in the Journal of Urban History and is available here.

I’m currently the co-director of War Stories: West Texans and the Experience of War from World War I to the Present, which is an National Endowment for the Humanities-funded project at Angelo State University. The project is working to preserve and present the experiences of military veterans and their families by digitizing their photographs, letters, and other memorabilia as well as interviewing them. These materials are preserved in a digital archive housed at Angelo State and partially available on the web. We are also putting on a series of related public presentations. For more information or to participate, see our website or email warstories [at] angelo.edu. A list of upcoming events can be found here. I’m also a host for the New Books in History podcast. For more information about these projects, see the public history tab.

Check out my recent Op-Ed on History News Network about Veteran’s Day celebrations.