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Online Education
Member, Texas Tech University System The Princeton Review - 373 Best Colleges, 2011 Edition

Online Undergraduate Certificate Programs
in Border Security

  • Introduction

    This certificate program requires students to complete 12 semester credit hours, or four courses, in border security. You can choose to specialize in one of these areas:

    • Crime and Border Security Studies
    • Cybersecurity
    • Emergency Management
    • Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism Studies

    Students must maintain an overall 2.0 grade point average and obtain a grade of at least a “C” in each required course. All course work for certificates must be taken in-residence; transfer credits from other institutions will not apply toward certificate programs.

  • Certificate Plan
    Certificate in Crime and Border Security Studies
    12 Credit Hours
    Course Number Course Description Hours
    BOR 3304 Transnational Crime 3
    BOR 3306 International Drug Trafficking 3
    BOR 3308 International Human Trafficking 3
    BOR 4310 Maritime Security 3
    Certificate in Cybersecurity
    12 Credit Hours
    Course Number Course Description Hours
    BOR 3307 Introduction to Cybersecurity 3
    BOR 3309 Information Security and Protection 3
    BOR 4301 Critical Communications Infrastructure 3
    BOR 4302 Space Imagery and Security 3
    Certificate in Emergency Management*
    12 Credit Hours
    Course Number Course Description Hours
    BOR 3322 Weapons of Mass Destruction 3
    BOR 4301 Critical Communications Infrastructure 3
    BOR 4330 Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Planning 3
    BOR 4351 Critical Infrastructure Protection 3

     

    Certificate in Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism Studies
    12 Credit Hours
    Course Number Course Description Hours
    BOR 3320 History of Terrorism 3
    BOR 3322 Weapons of Mass Destruction 3
    BOR 4321 Trends in Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism 3
    BOR 4330 Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Planning 3

    * Course substitutions are not allowed in this certificate.

  • Courses
    • BOR 4330 Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Planning (3-0). Effective emergency planning is the key to surviving natural and man-made disasters. Risk analysis and the formulation of a comprehensive plan, followed by a vigorous and continuing testing program, are essential elements to surviving an emergency. Topics covered include threat assessment, risk analysis, formulating a response plan, staffing an emergency operations center (EOC), interagency coordination and liaison, managing an actual incident, and conducting effective follow-up analysis. Student will select a critical infrastructure component within their communities, evaluate/establish strategic planning to respond to a disaster at that location, consider environmental impacts of a disaster, and present a portfolio of their analysis and response plans in an appropriate format. Actual case studies are discussed. Students are expected to participate actively in role-playing responses to disaster scenarios provide by the professor.

    • BOR 4321 Trends in Terrorism and Counterterrorism (3-0). This is a seminar course in which students examine new and growing threats including: narco-terrorism, environmental terrorism, terrorist recruitment methods, genomic terrorism, and threats to critical infrastructure. Students progress from analysis of past terrorism to present and future responses by national and international counterterrorism. Students consider historical defenses as well as new concepts and innovations for the prevention and mitigation of terrorist attacks. (Credit may not be earned for this course and Criminal Justice 4321.) Prerequisite: Border Security 3320 or Criminal Justice 3320.

    • BOR 4310 Maritime Security (3-0). This course provides students with a broad knowledge of port and coastal security issues and the efforts necessary to protect critical infrastructure. It examines the critical importance of ports of entry (ocean, land, and air) to trade and their vulnerability to disruption and attack. It also examines several contemporary issues, including the importance of sea borne trade to the North American and United State economies, the vulnerabilities of ports to disruption and asymmetric attack, critical port security incidents, and defensive measures to protect ports from disruption or asymmetric attack. Topics also include immigration, an overview of the federal, state and local organizations involved in port and coastal security, and non-U.S. approaches to border and coastal security.

    • BOR 4302 Space Imagery and Security (3-0). This capstone course of the Cybersecurity Track discusses the use of space-based assets to support the Homeland Security effort. Included are the limitations of the technologies, available commercial technologies, and the discussion of the legal, moral, and political issues surrounding the use of these technologies in a democratic society. Students will design and present a project as part of this course.

    • BOR 4301 Critical Communications Infrastructure (3-0). This course focuses on how cyber communication systems function, their interconnectivity, and vulnerabilities. The course materials focus on processes and policies associated with hardening and protecting critical communications infrastructure from natural hazards, potential terrorist threats, and attacks associated with modern warfare.

    • BOR 3322 Weapons of Mass Destruction (3-0). This course for the non-scientist is a study of chemical, biological, and radiological science involved in the different forms of weapons of mass destruction. Identification of critical infrastructure and the associated threats are analyzed. The course covers topics of basic science, treatment, and short- and long- term effects, among other issues central to understanding hostile WMD agents.

    • BOR 3309 Information Security and Protection (3-0). This course prepares students to assess the security needs of computer and network systems, recommend safeguard solutions, and manage the implementation and maintenance of security devices, systems, and procedures. Reviews of past hacking, criminal, and terrorist (state and non-state) attacks on information networks are a component of this course.

    • BOR 3308 International Human Trafficking (3-0). This course distinguishes between various types of human trafficking; provides an overview of the history of human trafficking and counterstrategies; discusses the causes and consequences of human trafficking; and critically assesses the achievements of counterstrategies devised and implemented by governments, international organizations, and private actors. This is a writing intensive course in which the student will perform directed research on topics related to human trafficking. (Credit may not be earned for this course and Criminal Justice 3308.)

    • BOR 3307 Introduction to Cybersecurity (3-0). This course introduces students to the wide range of modern communications technologies. Use of these technologies by government and business entities for intelligence gathering, their limitations, and vulnerabilities are introduced to students. An overview of the history of computer hacking is covered. Additionally, a brief overview of law and policy concerning cyber communications are discussed beginning with the National Security Act of 1947.

    • BOR 3306 International Drug Trafficking (3-0). This course is an in-depth study of the epidemic of drug abuse and its association with crime. The course encompasses all aspects of both legal and illegal drug abuse, pharmacology, gang activity, youth, violence, and behavioral pathology. It will also provide a robust examination of public policy issues associated with resolving the national drug control issue, drug trafficking, trends towards decriminalization/legalization, and law enforcement response. Students will have the opportunity to discuss contemporary drug-related issues of the day related to enforcement, medical treatment, harm reduction, or educational responses. Professor directed research in any of these drug policy issue areas will close out the course, enabling students to apply knowledge gained from the course to formulate intelligently their own opinions to develop possible societal solutions to this important national policy crisis. (Credit may not be earned for this course and Criminal Justice 3306.)

    • BOR 3304 Transnational Crime (3-0). This course differentiates the historical and contemporary patterns, modus operandi, capabilities, and vulnerabilities of transnational criminals and organizations. Course content includes a review of the contemporary literature of South American, Mexican, Asian, European, and African criminal enterprises, traditional organized crime, outlaw motorcycle gangs, and transnational criminal enterprises. In this seminar course the student will conduct directed research on a transnational crime topic and present the results of that research to the class. (Credit may not be earned for this course and Criminal Justice 3304.)