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Member, Texas Tech University System The Princeton Review - 373 Best Colleges, 2011 Edition

Undergraduate Online Program:
Cultural Fluency and Security Studies (B.C.F.S.S.)

  • Introduction

    imageThe Bachelor of Cultural Fluency and Security Studies program is meant to increase students’ language and cultural competency across a wide operational spectrum. Courses will increase your critical thinking and analytical skills in strategic culture, foreign policy and international security studies. 

    The degree requirements for the B.C.F.S.S. are the same as the requirements for the Bachelor of Cultural Competence and Security Studies with the exception of the language component. To be admitted to the B.C.F.S.S., students must demonstrate language proficiency in a language other than English by scoring a 2+ on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale on the Foreign Service Institute (FSI) exam or Defense Language Proficiency Test (DLPT). Students may also satisfy language proficiency in other ways as approved by the department chair.

    This program is designed for students who have completed their Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) from the Community College of the Air Force (CCAF). Other students who do not have a degree from the CCAF will follow the B.S.S. in Culture and Security Studies degree plan.

  • Applying

    1. Complete and submit the Undergraduate Admission Application and pay the $35 application fee online.

    Note: If you pay the $35 fee before you submit your application through the website, you will not have to mail in your payment or make a payment in person. Students are advised to pay their application fee through Apply Texas before they submit their application.

    When applying online through ApplyTexas, you will need to fill out your profile information first:

        • Under My Applications, select “Create a New Application Now.” 
        • Click on “Create a New 4-Year University Admissions Application.”  
        • Select Angelo State University as your Target University.
        • Under Application Type, select “Transfer, U.S.”
        • Choose the semester that you want to start.
        • Under First School Choice, select “AU-ABC program.” You can leave the second school choice blank.

    2. Mail official transcripts from all colleges attended to the Admissions Office. Transcripts should be mailed to:

    Angelo State University
    Office of Admissions
    ASU Station #11014
    San Angelo, TX 76909-1014


    (Note: CCAF transcripts can be ordered online.)

    For more information regarding admission procedures, please visit the ASU Office of Admissions website.

    Once admitted, please follow the steps for admitted students to set up your access accounts, sign up for courses, apply for financial aid, etc.

  • Degree Plan
     Bachelor of Cultural Fluency and Security Studies
    124 Credit Hours
    Courses Hours
    Cultural Competence 3310, 3312 6
    Cultural Competence and Security Studies 3315, 3317, 4150 7
    Cultural Competence and Security Studies* 18
     
    Courses Hours
    Communication 2301  3
    Computational and Applied Math 2305, Mathematics 1302, 1303, 1324, 1325, 1332, 1333, 1561, 2305, 2513  3
    Computer Literacy: Agricultural Economics 1351, Animal Science 1351, Business Computer Information Systems 1305, Computational and Applied Mathematics 1351, Computer Science 1301, 1341, 1351, 1361, 1371, Education 2323, Mass Media 2345, Mathematics 1351, Music 2353, Nursing 2338, or Theatre 2345  3
    English 1301, English 1302, and sophomore literature  9
    History 1301, 1302  6
    Natural Science (two lab sciences): biology, chemistry, geology, physics, physical science  8
    Political Science 2301, 2302  6
     Social Science: Agricultural Economics 1331, Ecnomics 2300, 2301, 2302, Geography 2301, 2305, Psychology 1303, 2301, Sociology 1303, 2301  3
    Visual and Performing Arts: Art 1301, 1302, 1305, 2301, 2302, Honors 2302, Music 1310, 1341, 1342, 1351, 1361, 1375, 1376, Theatre 1311, 1351, 1352  3
     Electives  49

    * Students must take a minimum of 18 semester hours in any combination of regional studies courses and functional security courses. 

  • Courses
    • CUL 3312 Cultural Competence: Making Sense of the World II (3-0).  This course is a continuation of Cultural Competence 3310 that extends its anal­ysis of cultural constructs to include specific issues related to international relations, solutions to global problems, and national security.

    • CUL 3310 Introduction to Cultural Competence: Making Sense of the World I (3-0). This course serves as an introduction to various analytical ap­proaches for understanding the dynamics of cross-cultural interaction. Students will explore the variety of “worlds” made visible through the lens of theory. The course aims to foster critical thinking about how cultural constructs shape our understanding of the world and attempted solutions to global problems.

    • CCSS 4381 Special Topics (3-0). A seminar in selected cultural competence and security studies topics. May be repeated once for credit when topic varies.

    • CCSS 4350 Globalization and International Security (3-0). Since the end of World War II, globalization has had a profound impact on the policies, economics, societies and militaries of both state and non-state actors on the regional and world stages. Globalization has brought improved conditions to some nation-states, but for others, it has created an environment of “haves and have nots.” Globalization has also led to ethnic, economic, and religious conflict in regions affecting the national security of the developed world. This course will analyze the way our interconnected world creates differing realities for different nation-states and regions, and what the likely scenarios are for the future of the 21st century. (Credit may not be earned for this course and Cultural Competence and Security Studies 4150.)

    • CCSS 4331 Cultural Competency and Contemporary Security Issues in Africa (3-0). This course focuses on current, major issues within the African region. While engaging in critical analysis of current issues, the course examines the broader conceptual context and analytic framework that explain interactions within the region and the international arena.

    • CCSS 4329 Cultural Competency and Contemporary Security Issues in the Middle East (3-0). This course focuses on current, major issues within the Middle Eastern region. While engaging in critical analysis of current issues, the course examines the broader conceptual context and analytic framework that explain interactions within the region and the international arena.

    • CCSS 4327 Cultural Competency and Contemporary Security Issues in Latin America (3-0). This course focuses on current, major issues within the Latin American region. While engaging in critical analysis of current issues, the course examines the broader conceptual context and analytic framework that explain interactions within the region and the international arena.

    • CCSS 4325 Cultural Competency and Contemporary Security Issues in Asia (3-0). This course focuses on current, major issues within the Asian region. While engaging in critical analysis of current issues, the course examines the broader conceptual context and analytic framework that explain interactions within the region and the international arena.

    • CCSS 4323 Cultural Competency and Contemporary Security Issues in Europe (3-0). This course focuses on current, major issues within the European region. While engaging in critical analysis of current issues, the course examines the broader conceptual context and analytic framework that explain interactions within the region and the international arena.

    • CCSS 4322 WMD, Proliferation, and International Security (3-0). This course examines control of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), the proliferation of these weapons, and the implications of both for international security. Students will analyze both the capabilities and the intentions of various nations as well as U.S. nuclear policy regarding both allies and adversaries. In addition, the course will explore the role of international organizations such as the UN and the IAEA in countering WMD and proliferation as well as important treaties such as the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty (NPT). Students will examine the role of both state and non-state actors in pursuing WMD capabilities and will assess possible policy responses to ensure international security.

    • CCSS 4321 The Political Economy of Africa (3-0). This course is an introduction to the political economy of Africa. Students will explore the theory and practice of how economic motives affect political decisions and how most political decisions have economic repercussions, both domestically and in Africa. This course reviews and explores the key themes of Africa’s contemporary political economy. In doing so, it concentrates on Africa’s relationship with the global political economy and raises questions about the nature of state action in African countries.

    • CCSS 4320 Human Rights and International Security (3-0). This is an introductory course in the field of Human Rights. The students will study the evolution of the notion of human rights from ancient time till the present day. The students will closely examine the nexus between the human rights and the national security by studying human security as a relatively new concept. The course includes the study of such major players in the field of human rights and human security as governments, inter-governmental organizations, NGO’s and other non-state actors. Of particular importance to this course is conducting an analysis of the role of civil society (human rights NGO’s, church groups, and grassroots groups). The course will feature important writings by practitioners and experts in the field.

    • CCSS 4319 The Political Economy of the Middle East (3-0). This course is an introduction to the political economy of the Middle East. Students will explore the theory and practice of how economic motives affect political decisions and how most political decisions have economic repercussions, both domestically and in the Middle East. This course reviews and explores the key themes of the Middle East’s contemporary political economy. In doing so, it concentrates on the Middle East’s relationship with the global political economy and raises questions about the nature of state action in Middle Eastern countries.

    • CCSS 4318 Rogue Nations and International Security (3-0). The end of the Cold War brought in a new era of world politics and security issues for the United States. But, with the new era came new paradigms and Washington is now faced with the issue of rogue nation-states. Iran, North Korea, Syria, and Cuba are examples (among others) of governments that conduct policies hostile to the United States and its allies. This course will examine paradigms of rogue state behavior; explore the issues that make rogue states dangerous to the United States and its allies, and analyze ways that policy makers can counter these hostile polices. The course will make use of case studies by examining the nation-states that have created challenges for America’s foreign policy.

    • CCSS 4317 The Political Economy of Latin America (3-0). This course is an introduction to the political economy of Latin America. Students will explore the theory and practice of how economic motives affect political decisions and how most political decisions have economic repercussions, both domestically and in Latin America. This course reviews and explores the key themes of Latin America’s contemporary political economy. In doing so, it concentrates on Latin America’s relationship with the global political economy and raises questions about the nature of state action in Latin American countries.

    • CCSS 4316 Energy and Resource Security (3-0). The class introduces the student to global resource security challenges in the 21st Century. Broadly interdisciplinary, the course uses business and international relations theories and analysis to examine resource security issues. Among the topics explored are the impact of resources on international trade, financial flows, the environment, nation-state competition, business practices and global security. The course examines the development of a national energy strategy and analyzes regional resource security issues. It concludes with an analysis of new technologies and resources that could dramatically alter the balance of power in the international system and the business world.

    • CCSS 4315 The Political Economy of Asia (3-0). This course is an introduction to the political economy of Asia. Students will explore the theory and practice of how economic motives affect political decisions and how most political decisions have economic repercussions, both domestically and in Asia. This course reviews and explores the key themes of Asia’s contemporary political economy. In doing so, it concentrates on Asia’s relationship with the global political economy and raises questions about the nature of state action in Asian countries.

    • CCSS 4311 Terrorism and International Security (3-0). The course introduces the student to terrorism in the contemporary world and the strategic challenges it poses for global and U.S. security. Among some of the key issues explored are terrorism’s causes, terrorist ideology, types of terror groups and their strategic goals and practices. The course looks at the rise of the Al Qaeda terror organization, explores the emergence of home grown or domestic terrorists, analyzes regional terrorist groups and examines the development of U.S. and international counter terror policy. It will conclude by examining how different states have responded to terror organizations and how successful these strategies have been.

    • CCSS 4310 The Political Economy of Europe (3-0). This course is an introduction to the political economy of Europe. Students will explore the theory and practice of how economic motives affect political decisions and how most political decisions have economic repercussions, both domestically and in Europe. This course reviews and explores the key themes of Europe’s contemporary political economy. In doing so, it concentrates on Europe’s relationship with the global political economy and raises questions about the nature of state action in European countries.

    • CCSS 4191, 4291, 4391 Research. Individual research problems for superior students majoring in cultural competence and security studies. May be repeated for a total of six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Junior standing. Approval from the Chair of the Department is required prior to enrollment.

    • CCSS 4150 Comparative Security Policy and Political Culture (1-0). Students will study the security policies and policy-making processes of various world regions as well as the national and regional implications of both traditional and nontraditional security issues. The course will examine the relationship between civilian authorities and the military establishment and the implications for governance. Grading will be either pass or fail. (Credit may not be earned for this course and Cultural Competence and Security Studies 4350.)

    • CCSS 4071 Internship. This course is designed to familiarize students with the application of knowledge gained in course work and with operations and problems in the field of cultural competence and security studies. Students must be pursuing a degree in Cultural Competence and Security Studies. Approval of instructor is required.

    • CCSS 3329 The Politics and Culture of Africa (3-0). This course will examine the historic, cultural, economic, social, religious, and geographic traits that distinguish the states of Africa and their domestic political processes and interstate relations. The course will compare critically the politics, governments, and orientations of selected African states. It will also cover contemporary regional issues such as democratization, arms control, and regional integration, with a particular emphasis on security concerns.

    • CCSS 3327 The Politics and Culture of the Middle East (3-0). This course will examine the historic, cultural, economic, social, religious, and geographic traits that distinguish this region and shape its domestic political processes and interstate relations. The course will examine the governments of selected countries while considering factors such as legitimacy and political development. The course will also cover contemporary regional issues such as democratization, arms control, and regional integration, with a particular emphasis on security concerns.

    • CCSS 3325 The Politics and Culture of Latin America (3-0). This course examines the historic, cultural, economic, social, and geographic traits that distinguish this region and shape its domestic political processes and interstate relations. Students will explore selected Latin American political systems in detail, analyzing issues such as political stability, civil-military relations, and democratization along with politico-economic concerns such as developmental strategies, debt relief, and trade relations. The course will also cover contemporary regional issues such as democratization, arms control, and regional integration, with a particular emphasis on security concerns.

    • CCSS 3323 The Politics and Culture of Asia (3-0). This course examines the historic, cultural, economic, processes, and interstate relations shaping this part of the world. The course will also cover contemporary regional issues such as the influence of Japan and China on regional and global affairs with a particular focus on regional security concerns.

    • CCSS 3321 The Politics and Culture of Europe (3-0). This course examines the historic, cultural, economic, social, and geographic traits that distinguish this region and shape its domestic political processes and interstate relations. Students will critically compare the politics, governments and orientations of European states and important regional powers. The course will also cover contemporary regional issues such as democratization, arms control, and regional integration, with a particular emphasis on security concerns.

    • CCSS 3317 American Government Politics and National Security (3-0). This course introduces students to the study of politics and government and examines the basic ideological, structural, and procedural choices faced by any political system. Students will understand the foundations and traditions of American democracy and the structure, decision processes and policy outcomes, especially defense policy outputs, of the American political system. Students will also examine current policy issues affecting the military.

    • CCSS 3315 Contemporary Security Issues in World Politics (3-0). This course focuses on current, major issues with an international dimension and/or global impact and with salience for the emerging patters of world politics. While engaging in critical analysis of current issues, it examines the broader conceptual context and analytic framework that explain interactions among nation states and other actors on the international stage.