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Member, Texas Tech University System The Princeton Review - 373 Best Colleges, 2011 Edition

Online Master’s Degree in Criminal Justice (M.S.)

  • Introduction

    The Department of Security Studies and Criminal Justice offers graduate course work leading to a Master of Science in criminal justice. The program is designed for those interested in pursuing deeper knowledge of U.S. criminal justice policies and practices beyond the baccalaureate level.

    Open to anyone with a bachelor’s degree, the program is especially appropriate for practitioners pursuing promotional opportunities. Anyone currently working in the field or preparing for federal, state or local agency employment should find the online format accommodating to their schedules.

    Our program is also supported by a comprehensive collection of journals, books and government documents relating to the numerous facets of criminal justice policy, leadership and research.

    For more information about admission to the program, visit the College of Graduate Studies and the Department of Security Studies and Criminal Justice websites.

  • Program Prerequisites
    •   Criminal Justice
      Admission Formula No formula
      Requirements
      Test Scores None
      All college and university transcripts Yes
      Essay Yes
      Résumé No
      Prerequisites
      • Hold a bachelor’s degree with a GPA of 2.75 or better, including all grades on repeated courses – or hold a bachelor’s degree with a GPA of 3.0 or better in the last 60 hours of undergraduate work.
      • At least two letters of recommendation
      • An essay of no more than 750 words written in endnote or footnote format regarding your opinion of the single most important challenge facing 21st century criminal justice. Outside sources may be used.
  • Degree Program
    Master of Science (M.S.) in Criminal Justice
    36 Credit Hours

    Courses

    Hours

    CRIJ 6330 Critical Analysis of Justice Administration

    3

    CRIJ 6332 Criminal Justice Theory

    3

    CRIJ 6334 Research Methods in Security Studies

    3

    CRIJ 6339 Police in Society

    3

    CRIJ 6372 Seminar in Corrections

    3

    CRIJ 6387 Seminar in Criminal Justice Agency Ethics

    3

    CRIJ 6389 Capstone Seminar in Criminal Justice

    3

    CRIJ 6393 Legal Aspects of the Criminal Justice System

    3

    CRIJ elective courses

    12                 

    All students must successfully pass a comprehensive final exam before graduation. This does not need to take place on the ASU campus and can be done via teleconference or other appropriate methods. Please see the section on Advisory Committees for oral comprehensive exams in the ASU Catalog under Academic Guidelines and Graduate Studies Policies.

  • Courses
    • CRIJ 6393 Legal Aspects of the Criminal Justice System (3-0). In this overview of various aspects of law that are relevant to and essential for a better understanding of the criminal justice system and its related processes, students analyze and brief critical court decisions that have shaped the PCC system.

    • CRIJ 6389 Capstone Seminar in Criminal Justice (3-0). This course is a research seminar in which students will develop skills in locating, extracting, evaluating, and synthesizing information acquired from their prior courses. Students write a publishable, article-length, paper based on independent research. Students may also be expected to supplement their research with other readings under the direction of the professor.

    • CRIJ 6387 Seminar in Criminal Justice Agency Ethics (3-0). The study of criminal justice without the concurrent study of justice is simply criminal. This course exposes students to the ethics (and lack thereof) of criminal justice agencies. Scenario evaluation, active discussion, and theoretically based argumentation and decision-making are all key components of this seminar. (Credit may not be earned for this course and Border Security 6387.)

    • CRIJ 6372 Seminar in Corrections (3-0). A variety of problems in American Corrections are explored, including the philosophy of prisons, sentencing, community corrections, rehabilitation, and correctional reform. The efficacy of the death penalty is evaluated. Students also investigate the sources of professional shortcomings, system deficiencies, and public inadequacies to develop theoretically based proposals to address these issues.

    • CRIJ 6339 Police in Society (3-0). An examination of the evolution of police in modern society with a special emphasis given to the role police play in contemporary society. Current research examining the function of the police and trends and techniques in policing are examined.

    • CRIJ 6334 Research Methods in Security Studies (3-0). Research methods with application to intelligence, homeland security, criminal justice, and other security-related interests. (Credit may not be earned for this course and ISSA 6305, SEC 6305, or BOR 6334.)

    • CRIJ 6332 Criminal Justice Theory (3-0). Overview of the major paradigms focusing on the causes of crime and deviant behavior with special attention given to the social, political, and intellectual philosophies within which each perspective arose. Students discuss criminological theories from a philosophy of science perspective, focusing upon such issues as theory construction, theoretical integration, and the formal evaluation of theory.

    • CRIJ 6330 Critical Analysis of Justice Administration (3-0). An analysis of the criminal justice system in the United States; role of justice agencies as part of societal response to crime; knowledge base of criminal justice; issues, problems, trends.