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Member, Texas Tech University System The Princeton Review - 373 Best Colleges, 2011 Edition

September 2006

Release Date: September 11, 2006

Mural Brings Childrens Literature to Life in ASU Library

A mural conceived and painted by Angelo State University art students to capture the unlimited journeys children can take when reading will be unveiled in the Juvenile and Curriculum Collections area of ASUs Porter Henderson Library Monday, Sept. 18.

The ceremony, scheduled at 2 p.m. Sept. 18 on the first floor of the library, will feature ASU President James Hindman, Ram mascot Roscoe, Library Director Maurice Fortin and the student artists who painted the 9-by-21-foot mural. The unveiling is open to the public.

The colorful mural depicts Roscoe reading to a boy and girl whose imaginations take them to another world of princes and princesses while a myriad of bunnies, butterflies, birds and turtles listen in.

Painted in vibrant colors to catch the imagination of children and the attention of adults, the mural resides on the south wall of the librarys juvenile/children's literature area that is used extensively by elementary education students for classroom assignments and student teaching. The artists used 11 base colors to create more than 250 hues in the mural.

"I wanted to create an atmosphere of a juvenile/children's literature area in a public library," Fortin said, "and our art students did an absolutely wonderful job of making the joy of reading come alive."

Members of Kappa Pi Zeta Phi International Honorary Art Fraternity worked on the project, spearheaded by Nick Schwartz. Schwartz, Ruben Arispe and Heather Pokrant were the primary artists on the project. Other ASU art students involved in the conception and production of the mural were Juanita Exiga, Rita Riggs, Crystal Conner, Alicia Weber and D.J. Sutterfield.

"The mural itself," said Schwartz, "is a combination of two distinct artistic styles to help convey two separate worlds the real world of the children and the dream world they are imagining. The animation style was chosen for the real world portion of the mural instead of the dream bubble portion to emphasize the ability of the imagination to see a better world through literature."