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April 2008

Release Date: April 7, 2008

Holocaust Survivors to Talk at ASU

The horrors of the Holocaust will be recalled by three survivors during a program at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 10, in Room 110-111 of the Houston Harte University Center on the campus of Angelo State University.

Open free to the public, the program will begin with an overview of the Holocaust by Dr. Gail Wallen, director of Holocaust Services, Jewish Family and Children’s Service of Southern Arizona. After Wallen’s talk, Wanda Wolosky, Walter Feiger and Lilly Brull will offer their firsthand accounts of the Nazi terrors they endured.

The Holocaust survivor session is sponsored by ASU’s Multicultural Center and co-hosted by ASU and Goodfellow Air Force Base. A reception will follow the program.

Wolosky survived the Warsaw Ghetto, where Nazis crowded into a three-square-mile section of the Polish city some 445,000 Jews in a virtual concentration camp. She risked execution to scavenge for food at night, just to survive.

Feiger, also from Poland and the only survivor from his family, was put into the ghettos before being moved to labor and concentration camps, such as Gross Rozen and Mathausen. He remained in captivity from September of 1939 until May of 1945.

Brull, a native of Antwerp, Belgium, was 10 years old when the Germans invaded her homeland in 1940. She and her family escaped Belgium afoot and spent a year evading the Germans in France before they were able to escape on a ship to Martinique in 1941.

The talk will come two days shy of the 63rd anniversary of the liberation of the Buchenwald and Belsen concentration camps when the world began to fully understand the magnitude of Nazi Germany’s atrocities against civilians.

The national theme for this year’s Holocaust memorials is “Do Not Stand Silent: Kristallnacht 1938.” Kristallnacht, German for “Night of Broken Glass,” refers to a wave of terror unleashed by Nazis on Nov. 9, 1938, against thousands of synagogues, Jewish businesses and homes. The next day the streets were littered with the shattered glass from the vandalism.

The goal of the program is to help people remember the Holocaust and to show the danger of unchecked and unfettered government oppression. For more information, call 942-2073.