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April 2001

Release Date: April 25, 2001

Nuclear Physicist to Deliver ASU Spring Commencement Address

Dr. Jay C. Davis, a nuclear physicist and director of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) in Washington, D.C., will deliver the commencement address at Angelo State University's spring graduation ceremony May 11 in the San Angelo Coliseum.

More than 400 ASU seniors and graduate students will receive their degrees during the commencement ceremony at 7 p.m. May 11.

Davis is returning to ASU after serving as the AEP/West Texas Utilities Distinguished Professor in Residence in the fall of 1998.

As head of the DTRA, Davis works to safeguard America and its allies from weapons of mass destruction by reducing the present threat and preparing for any future threats.

He has been a scientific adviser to the United Nations Secretariat, to several U.S. agencies and to scientific agencies of the Australian and New Zealand governments. He participated in two United Nations inspections of Iraq as an expert on mass spectrometry and construction techniques.

In 1988 he was appointed director of the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, a multi-disciplinary, multi-organizational group applying accelerator analytical techniques to problems in biomedicine, geochemistry, materials science and arms control.

Davis was appointed Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's associate director of environmental programs in 1994. His duties included integrating the laboratory's efforts in environmental research, development and demonstration.

His other career accomplishments include work as a research scientist and an engineering manager, leading the design and construction of several unique accelerator facilities used for basic and applied research.

He holds bachelor of arts and master of arts degrees, both in physics, from the University of Texas. He has a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Wisconsin and is a fellow of the American Physical Society.

For his contributions to national security, the U.S. Department of Defense has twice awarded him the Distinguished Public Service Medal, its highest civilian award