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May 2002

Release Date: May 06, 2002

ASU Prof to Spend 4 Weeks Researching, Teaching in Vietnam

Dr. Bruce Converse McKinney, an assistant professor of communication at Angelo State University, will spend four weeks in Vietnam this summer researching differences in American/Vietnamese communication and teaching short courses in basic negotiating skills.

McKinney, a faculty member in the Department of Communication, Drama and Journalism, will be making his fifth trip to Vietnam and will be working with members of the Center for Systems Development at Vietnam National University in Hanoi.

Previously, he has taught courses on negotiation at Vietnam National University. A variety of Vietnamese corporations, including Vietnamese Post and Telecommunications, PetroVietnam, Vietnam Airlines, New Asia Industries and KPMG, have enrolled employees in his courses.

McKinney's stay in Vietnam is sponsored by Vietnam National University. Because the university cannot afford to pay for his transportation to the country, McKinney must pay for that himself, but once he arrives in the country the university pays for all transportation, lodging, meal and incidental expenses.

His previous work with the university has taken him all over Vietnam, including Hanoi, Hue, Halong Bay, Vung Tau and Ho Chi Minh City, formerly Saigon.

McKinney said that atmosphere in Vietnam toward the United States is positive, especially since normalization of relations and ratification of a bilateral trade agreement between the two countries. As an example of the relationship between the countries, he noted that a Ford Motor plant outside Hanoi flies a Ford corporate flag, a Vietnamese flag and the Star-Spangled Banner.

The Vietnamese have put the war behind them, McKinney said, noting that 60 percent of Vietnam's current population was not even born when Saigon fell in 1975. As a result, McKinney said he has never been treated better anywhere in his life than while visiting Vietnam