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Member, Texas Tech University System The Princeton Review - 373 Best Colleges, 2011 Edition

April 2004

Release Date: April 23, 2004

ASU Trio Earns Medical School Summer Internships through State Program

Three Angelo State University pre-med majors have been accepted into the state's Joint Admission Medical Program (JAMP) and have been awarded summer internships with the Baylor College of Medicine.

Dace Mahanay of San Angelo, Michael Martinez of Pampa and Melissa Warren of Dawn are among an elite number of students accepted from universities statewide to participate in the JAMP internships.

JAMP was established by the 77th Texas Legislature to encourage and help highly qualified but economically disadvantaged students pursue a medical education. Successful applicants not only receive an undergraduate scholarship at a participating university, but also are guaranteed admission and a scholarship to a participating Texas medical school.

To be considered as a JAMP applicant during the fall semester, students had to complete 15 semester credit hours, including freshman biology and chemistry with a 3.25 or higher grade point average. Applicants also had to be certified by the Financial Aid Office as eligible for a federal Pell Grant.

In addition to their scholarships and guaranteed admission to a Texas medical school, Mahanay, Martinez and Warren will also receive a stipend to spend the first summer semester after their undergraduate freshman, sophomore and junior years at a different medical school. As JAMP interns, they will attend medical school classes, receive study skills instruction, undergo training for the Medical College Admission Test and accompany physicians on their rounds to see patients.

Because of the high participation and application rate among students, ASU's JAMP program under the direction of co-directors Dr. Alan Bloebaum and Dr. R. Russell Wilke of the biology faculty has become a model for the 43 participating public and private universities statewide.