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EML Expanded Descriptions for 2015 Courses

October 20, 2014

Expanded Descriptions for Spring 2015 English and Modern Languages Courses

 

ENGLISH

 

English 2323.010: Readings in British Literature - Hartje

“The journey is the destination.”  The various readings in English 2323 will in some way relate to the theme of “Taking the Journey.”  We will read poetry and two novels, taking our own journey to discover the treasure trove of ideas found in literature from the 19th and 20th centuries that come to us from across the pond.  You might be surprised to find how often you will see yourself, your friends, or your family in these stories and poems from British literature.

 

English 2323.020: Readings in British Literature - Jackson

In this course introducing great works of the British tradition, we will be reading a variety of genres, including the drama, the essay, the lyric poem, the short story, and the novel. We will be charting some trends over time, but above all we’ll be working to understand each work and what it has to teach us about ourselves a little better and to examine how genre, original context, and our own perspectives affect meaning. Authors whose works we will read include Shakespeare, Austen, and Joyce. This course fulfills the core curriculum requirement in Philosophy, Language, and Culture.

 

English 2323.030 and 060:  Readings in British Literature – Ashworth-King

A response to the desire to define “violence” might conjure images from recent horror films, but before Michael Myers, violence existed in the imaginative literature of Britain. Violence is used to overpower the weak, urge reform, reinstate social mores, and simply titillate. This semester, we will puzzle out the nature of violence, chronicling the rise of such literature from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance to the Modern. Beginning the course with Beowulf, we will then explore the early modern tragedies of blood, as demonstrated by a sampling of Shakespeare’s tragedies. After that, we will examine war poetry, with emphasis upon the world wars.  This course fulfills the language, philosophy and culture requirement.

 

English 2324.010: Readings in American Literature – Kornasky

According to ASU’s course catalog, English 2324 is “a study of diverse works by American writers. Emphasis on reading, comprehending, appreciating, and thinking critically about the selected works within the context of American culture and literary history” (269). The six selected texts for this section represent four major movements in American literature: romanticism, realism, naturalism, and modernism.

 

English 2324.040: Readings in American Literature - Wegner

This course is designed as a sophomore introduction to American literature. The reading list is not comprehensive, nor is it designed to create an exhaustive list of “classic” literature. Instead, the goal of the reading list is to create opportunities for discussing movements and trends in literature and culture. In large part, I hope you leave the class with a renewed appreciation for literature and an increased aptitude for critical thinking. The works we read will allow us to explore both culture and identity, while gaining a greater sense of our shared humanity.

 

English 2324.050: Readings in American Literature – Dalrymple

The topic for this course will be “Journeys in American Literature.” Students will read a variety of American literature that explores truths of human experiences as reflected in characters’ journeys, both literal and figurative. Throughout the literary journey the class will take, students will also review key literary terms, an understanding of which leads to a deeper understanding and appreciation of literature and what it reveals about human nature and American culture. Music, fine art, and film may serve as supplemental material that will enhance that understanding and appreciation.

 

English 2325.040 and 050: Readings in World Literature - Hartje

Magic happens—especially in English 2325!  The readings in this class come from international authors, and the stories and poems in some way relate to the theme of “Magic in our Midst.”  We will read short fiction, poetry, and two novels from the 19th and 20th centuries that will surprise and amaze you.

 

English 2328.010 and 020: Introduction to Literature and Creative Writing - Dalrymple

This course focuses on the mechanics that help shape the magic of poetry and fiction. It emphasizes the elements of each genre which ultimately create a whole larger than the sum of its parts. Students will read a variety of poems and short stories as well as write their own original imaginative pieces. All assignments for the class are aimed at enhancing students’ abilities to read and compose effective creative writing.

 

English 3301.010:  Medieval Literature – Ashworth-King

Subtitled “Knights Errant and Damsels in Distress: Constructing Gender in Medieval Literature,” this course will survey the earliest literature of Britain, beginning with Old English (in translation) and then moving on to Middle English.  Organized chronologically, this course will take as its focus the prose, poetry and drama of the middle ages, examining works of the Gawain poet, religious literature of the period, Chaucer, Langland, Malory, etc., to tease out the ways these authors and medieval culture approach gender.  More specifically, we will interrogate how the literature of the period constructs and complicates masculinity and femininity and how such constructions both reinforce and challenge culture. This course fulfills the pre-1800 requirement for English majors. 

 

English 3312.010: English Literature of the Restoration and Enlightenment - Jackson

The historical period that this course surveys, now called the long eighteenth century, was one rife with change and laid the foundation of the modern west. The literature of the time was equally diverse and influential. We will try to sample as much of its variety as we can. That means verse satires, comedies of manners, the new novel of realism, the essay, neoclassical poetry, licentious poetry, sentimental novels, and, last but not least, Jane Austen.

 

English 3332.010: American Literature after 1870 – Kornasky

According to ASU’s course catalog, English 3332 is “a survey of authors, genres, themes, and movements in American literature after 1870.” This section will focus on the aesthetic and ideological aspects of American realism, naturalism, and modernism in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, as well as on theatrical innovations associated with “the Great American Play” movement.

 

English 3351: Technical Writing – Garrison or Dilts

Offered both online and face-to-face

This course will focus on creating practical, workplace documents, such as resumes, proposals, instructions, definitions, and statements of purpose. Special attention is given to document design, audience-awareness, multicultural concerns, and graduate school preparation. At the end of the semester, students (especially in the sciences and the technical fields) should feel comfortable being able to successfully communicate their subject matter expertise to a variety of audiences. The required textbook is the second edition of Technical Communication in the Twenty-First Century.

 

English 3354 - Intercultural and International Technical and Business Writing – Dilts

Offered in the spring semesters only.

This course focuses on communicating with audiences in different cultures, both within and outside of the United States. Students will learn how to research audiences from different cultures and how to address their communication needs and their rhetorical preferences for communication. Emphasis is placed on all aspects of culture that affect communication and living and working abroad, such as the cultural theories of various communication scholars, writing in various genres to conducting, participating in business meetings, negotiating, gift giving, etiquette, social norms, and more. At the end of the semester, students will be able to investigate a culture and design and execute a deliverable appropriate for the audience and for the communication situation. Required textbooks include “Intercultural Business Communication,” fifth edition, by Chaney and Martin, and “Multicultural Manners” by Dresser.

 

English 4322.010: The Teaching of Literature - Gates

Offered in the spring semesters only.

This course prepares English majors seeking secondary certification for the challenges, theories, and methods of teaching canonical, multicultural, world, and young adult literature to 7th through 12th grade students with diverse backgrounds and skills. The course is required for all English majors seeking secondary certification. Students taking this course should have taken several upper level English courses (3000 and 4000) before attempting this course, as the course assignments and projects draw from knowledge accumulated during the degree program, especially in upper level literature courses. The course is intended as a rigorous preparation to be taken just prior to student teaching at the secondary level in English, and as a course that provides resources and a foundation that can carry students through their first few years as actual high school English teachers.

 

English 4332.010: Studies in the American Novel - Wegner

Walt Whitman’s claim that American artists will occupy a divine status among men echoes Emerson’s call for a “Man Thinking” to “write” America’s “own books.” While the rhetoric of both men is decidedly patriarchal, America has produced plenty of poet-prophets, men and women, who have created (and continue to create) America’s story. The novels we will read are not a definitive list of the best of North American fiction. However, these works will allow us to look closely at both literary and social movements of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries and, hopefully, see the connections between the two.

 

English 4365.010: Usability Testing in Technical and Business Writing - Garrison

How do people read documents? Play video games? Interact with websites? Analyze advertisements? This course will focus on answering these questions by testing interfaces for usability. During the semester, students will learn theories of usability, skills of usability testers, and methodologies of usability testing. Practical assignments include working with an eye tracker to identify user’s eye movements on a screen and completing a project that tests a client’s document for usability concerns. Students will also read chapters from the Handbook of Usability Testing and work in a usability laboratory during the semester.

 

English 4376.010: Fiction Writing Workshop - Dalrymple

This course takes up where English 3355 left off. Students continue honing technical skills that help create the magic of fiction. Students will consider some excellent published works of fiction with an eye toward refining their own fiction. Students will also read classmates’ work and critique them in multiple workshop sessions. The aim is to produce at least one publishable work of fiction.

 

English 6301.010: British Literary History - Hartje

The content of this course will be exactly what its title indicates: a survey of British literary history.  We will engage with representative works from the seven literary periods, from Middle English Literature to The Twentieth Century.  These 600 years of English literature offer a rich variety of poetry, prose, and drama.  Students will have an opportunity to pursue independent research projects for their choice of three of the seven periods.  This course offers a broad and valuable foundation in British literature.

 

English 6345.010: Studies in Writing and Technology – Garrison

This course is for MA students at ASU interested in exploring what technology is, how it works, and how it connects with studies of writing. It is applicable for students with a variety of interests and career paths, such as:

  • history (i.e. the evolution of writing and technology, digital media)
  • philosophy (i.e. philosophies of technology and questions concerning utopia/dystopia)
  • teaching (i.e. composition pedagogy, instructional design, blogs, wikis, distance education)
  • literature (i.e. works in the vein of 1984, Fahrenheit 451, Jurassic Park)
  • technical writing (i.e. usability, user-centeredness, accessibility, design)
  • rhetoric (i.e. the history of rhetoric, democratization)

For the first half of the semester, we’ll tackle two theoretical questions: 1) what is technology? and 2) what is writing? For the second half of the semester, we’ll move from theory to application. We’ll read several authors who have explored technology and writing – texts include Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, Paul Levinson’s The Soft Edge: A Natural History and Future of the Information Revolution, and several other selected works.

 

English 6335: American Fiction - Serrano

This course will be a survey of the sub-genres of American fantasy and science fiction, such as Dystopian, Space Opera, and Steampunk. The course will cover the origin of fantasy in the works of Hawthorne up to the works of contemporary fantasy writers, such as H.P. Lovecraft and his contributions to the horror fiction pulp magazine Weird Tales. We will then study various explorers of the world of science fiction, such E. E. Smith and his Skylark series and Paul di Filippo’s Steampunk Trilogy. We will also evaluate the texts we cover through various critical lenses, such as Jessica Langer’s Postcolonialism and Science Fiction.  

 

SPANISH

 

Spanish 1302: Spanish II all sections– Onofre-Madrid, Faught, O’Dell, Peters, Schmidt

Chapters 5 through 8 of the 6th  edition of ¡Arriba! This second semester Spanish course is designed to continue the introduction to the language and culture of the Spanish-speaking countries. The students will practice the four language skills (listening/understanding, speaking, reading, and writing) both with the instructor and with classmates. The course materials provide abundant communicative activities along with many form-focused exercises and offer a good variety of authentic cultural materials. Practice will continue beyond the classroom with technology-based materials. National Standards describe the Five C’s of Foreign Language Education: Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities. Successful students will learn ?how, when, and why to say what to whom.

 

Spanish 2311: Spanish III in 8 weeks – Onofre-Madrid

Chapters 9 through 12 of the 6th  edition of ¡Arriba! This third semester Spanish course is designed to continue the exploration of the language and culture of the Spanish-speaking countries. The students will practice the four language skills (listening/understanding, speaking, reading, and writing) both with the instructor and with classmates. The course materials provide abundant communicative activities along with many form-focused exercises and offer a good variety of authentic cultural materials.  Practice will continue beyond the classroom with technology-based materials.  National Standards describe the Five C’s of Foreign Language Education:  Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities.  Successful students will learn “how, when, and why to say what to whom.”

 

Spanish 2312: Spanish IV – Faught and Onofre-Madrid

Chapters 13 through 15 of the 6th  edition of ¡Arriba! This fourth semester Spanish course is designed to continue the exploration of the language and culture of the Spanish-speaking countries. The students will practice the four language skills (listening/understanding, speaking, reading, and writing) both with the instructor and with classmates. The course materials provide abundant communicative activities along with many form-focused exercises and offer a good variety of authentic cultural materials. Practice will continue beyond the classroom with technology-based materials. National Standards describe the Five C’s of Foreign Language Education: Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities. Successful students will learn “how, when, and why to say what to whom.”

 

Spanish 3302.010: Advanced Spanish Grammar for Composition – O’Dell

This course is designed to help third-year students better understand some of the more difficult grammatical concepts as well as increase the accuracy with which students apply them in their written expression. In order to more closely approximate educated native speech students will learn to correctly utilize idiomatic expressions, words with more than one Spanish equivalent, and Spanish words with more than one meaning in English.  Grammar as related to composition.  Prerequisite: successful completion of Spanish 2312.

 

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