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Signature Course Descriptions

  • Sport Psychology

    MW 12:00 - 12:50
    Jordan Daniel (Kinesiology)
    Section F22

    The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the field of sport and exercise psychology. An emphasis will be placed on the application of psychological theories and training techniques specifically for improved sports performance.

  • Science @ Human Values

    Online
    Fred Wilson (Physics/Geosciences)
    Section DF1

    Every newspaper in the US publishes an Astrological column daily but almost none have a weekly Science column. Astrology has no effect on lives but science affects us daily in uncountable ways. Everyone needs to understand the scientific process, the role of science in human affairs, and the potential for abuse and misuse. There is a significant antiscience community out there and that position needs careful analysis, as well.

  • An Easy A

    Online
    Laurence Musgrove (English and Modern Languages)
    Section DF2

    This course is designed to introduce incoming freshmen to the intellectual and cultural environment of the university and the impact it will have on their lives as students. Freshman Seminars incorporate various integral elements in order to facilitate first-year students’ transition from high-school to college-level learning. Emphasis will be on communication, critical thinking, and information literacy. Open to all majors: restricted to and required of first-time-in-college students.

  • Surviving College Stress

    Hybrid
    Jay Brown (Health Science Professions)
    Section DF3

    This course provides an introduction to managing stress with an emphasis on healthy lifestyle behaviors. Specific topics include defining stress, stress prevention strategies and stress reduction techniques.

  • Business Aspects of the Superhero Movie Industry

    MW 12:00 - 12:50
    Michael Conklin (Accounting, Economics, and Finance)
    Section F01

    This interdisciplinary course will utilize the superhero movie industry to discuss issues of international business, contract law, marketing, and representation of race/gender. Students will learn not only about behind-the-scenes considerations in the movie industry, but also business in general.

  • The History of BBQ

    MW 12:00-12:50
    John Kellermeier (Agriculture)
    Section F02

    This course will provide an overview of the history of BBQ in America. Emphasis will focus on the evolution of BBQ from Colonial America to the current state of BBQ in restaurants and competition cooking. Regional favorites, various cuts of meat, spices, cookery method, and wood types will be explored throughout the duration of the course.

  • Dear Life

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Audrey Zoeller (Agriculture)
    Section F03

    This course would provide practical information in regards to communication and how to address emails, people, letters, etc. I have found that students lack general knowledge of how to correctly format an email to professors and instructors. Additionally, students have limited knowledge of how to correctly address an envelope when they are asked to mail hard copies. This course can also focus on improving other life skills such as critical thinking, decision-making and time management.

  • Breaking Ice and Building Bridges

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Ellada Gamreklidze (Comm/Mass Media)
    Section F05

    This will be a course designed for ASU’s diverse, international and multicultural student body. It will be focused on bringing together American and international students, familiarizing them with each other’s cultures, traditions and ways of life. Through the discussion of food, fashion, customs, family and other topics, the course will better prepare the freshmen to understand, accept and communicate with each other through their upcoming years as the members of Ram Fam.

  • Stock Market Investing: Buying Your First Share of Stock

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Herman Howard (Comm/Mass Media)
    Section F06

    This course will study how you can and will be a stock market investor by learning about the American stock market, understanding the 11 different sectors to be implied, learning the various platforms that you can use to buy stocks, selecting and buying stocks online for short-term and long-term financial growth for passive income.

  • Career Clarity: Exploration and Development

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Brook Dickinson (Curriculum and Instruction)
    Section F08

    The purpose of this class is to provide tools and experiences to help students make progress in their personal career development. This is a hands-on class. Students will be required to complete assessments, attend career development programs, and speak to professionals in the career field of the student’s choice.

  • Leading Social Change: Rams Who Make a Difference (MAD Rams)

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Kinsey Hansen / Gina Shipley (Curriculum & Instruction)
    Section F09

    Making A Difference (MAD): to cause change; to be important in some way. MAD Rams explores how students can engage in leadership for social change. If you want to make a difference, aspire to develop leadership competencies as vehicles for social change, or just want to be part of a group seeking a focus on kindness and humanity, this course is for you.

    Through exploration of the social change model, this course will dig into critical issues such as basic needs insecurity including food and housing insecurity, inter-social treatment, and other critical issues facing social justice. As a class, we will research and identify critical issues of interest, collaborate on strategies for change, and participate in activities that help our friends and communities.

  • Where Society & Agriculture Collide

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Mike Salisbury (Dean, Freshman College/Prof. Agriculture)
    Section F10

    The topic used to accomplish the course will be evaluating how societal views have shaped agriculture and the food industry. We will evaluate how emotion, media (social and mainstream), and socioeconomic status impact how we make our decisions and shape our perceptions. The course will also look into the differences by region within our country and how we have differences among countries. Students will use an area of the discussion they have strong personal feelings toward to develop a summary to justify their beliefs both scientifically and socially. Everyone has views about how agriculture and society interact and each student should be able to relate to a topic.

  • Success 101

    TR 3:30-4:20
    Tia Agan & Elaine Stribling (Curriculum and Instruction and Teacher Education)
    Section F11

    The purpose of this course is to provide strategies and tools for freshmen to utilize to reach their goals through meaningful experiences and purposeful steps during their time at Angelo State University, in addition to life skills, such as cooking, organizing, problem-solving, and navigating challenges. The focus of this course will be to empower students to gain self-efficacy and a growth mindset to help them achieve academically and overcome setbacks. 

  • Career Exploration

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Paul Swets (Dean, S&E/Prof. Mathematics)
    Section F12

    This course creates a classroom environment where first-year students can interact with faculty and other students regarding topics of shared interest. Signature courses focus on contemporary or interdisciplinary issues while covering an array of topics related to success at the university level. This class will center around helping students discover, or more completely understand their major and career goals. Using software that identifies students’ values, aptitudes, and aspirations, students will learn what majors and careers are best “fit”, and they will have a better understanding of the course work and education required to succeed. This course is a great option for students unsure of their major or future career goals. Emphasis will be placed on advancing communication and information literacy skills, along with the transition to success at Angelo State University.

  • Personal and Family History

    MW 12:00-12:50
    David Faught (English Modern Languages )
    Section F13

    This course will focus on four things; 1) personal history (narrative as well as visual); 2) family history (helping a parent or grandparent record their personal history); 3) genealogy; 4) the resources at ASU that will help you research and write effectively and efficiently. By the time you finish the course, you will have completed video presentations that incorporate pics, videos and audio narration from you and a loved one as well as a 4 generation genealogy chart. As we learn how to organize and present personal and family histories, we will explore the resources that ASU has to offer to help you succeed as a student.

  • The Way We Look at Things: Exercises in Observation

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Anna Arreola (English & Modern Language)
    Section F14

    How observant are YOU? In this course, you’ll be given opportunities to stretch your powers of observation. The course includes exercises in drawing and poetry (notice the details), practical instruction for college (notice academic conventions), training in critical thinking (notice logical patterns of thought), reflection on your habits and mental health (notice where you spend your time and energy), and tips on communicating with others (notice the person). If you like paying attention to details and you don’t mind a challenge, this course is for you.

  • Acclimating to the University for Students with Special Needs

    TR 8:00 - 8:50am
    Nicole St. Germaine (English and Modern Languages)
    Section F16

    This course is designed to acclimate students to the community services at their disposal, such as services offered by Student Disability Services, as well as other campus services and amenities, like advising, tutoring, career counseling, student organizations, and more. The course will also teach advocacy skills for students and help to educate them about their rights.

  • I Love that Show!

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Erica Bailey (Communication / Mass Media)
    Section F17

    We’ve all heard someone mention what they’ve been watching on Netflix and found ourselves saying “I love that show!” Why are we drawn to some shows and not others? This course will help you to answer that question. Specifically, we will explore how our selection of media is influenced by psychological factors such as mood, emotion, and personality traits. We will also examine how our selection and interpretation of media is impacted by social situations and emerging technologies such as co-viewers, mobile devices, time-shifting devices, and social media. As heavy media consumers, media literacy is important. One way we can improve our media literacy is by understanding the psychological processes at work when consuming media. This course will provide an overview of major media effects and media selection theories with a focus on entertainment media.

  • Discovering your Strength

    MW 9:00-9:50
    Kristi White (Health Science Professions)
    Section F18

    This course is designed to introduce incoming freshmen to the intellectual and cultural environment of the university and the impacts it will have on their lives as students. Freshman Seminars incorporate various integral elements in order to facilitate first-year students’ transition from high school to college-level learning. Emphasis will be on communication, critical thinking, and information literacy. Students will learn how to tap into their natural talents and develop their strengths and personality.

  • The Western & American Cultural Value

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Jason Pierce (History )
    Section F20

    This course is designed to introduce incoming freshmen to the intellectual and cultural environment of the university and the effect it will have on their lives as students. Freshman Seminars incorporate various integral elements in order to facilitate first-year students’ transition from high school to college-level learning. Emphasis will be on communication, critical thinking, and information literacy. Open to all majors; restricted to and required of first-time-in-college students.

  • Whitetail Fever

    TR 3:30-4:20
    Doyle Carter (Kinesiology )
    Section F21

    Whitetail fever is a common condition affecting those who enjoy the hunting and outdoor lifestyle. Symptoms include a desire to learn more about: a) hunter ethics and safety, b) hunting tactics and technologies, and c) wildlife and habitat management practices. At maturity, whitetail fever is characterized by a deep appreciation for the great outdoors and our natural resources. This course exposes students to hunting and outdoor research and allows students to share their own knowledge and experience, all in an effort to become mature outdoorsmen/women.

  • Outdoor Fitness

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Adam Parker (Kinesiology)
    Section F23

    This course explores the depths of outdoor recreation. Course participants will immerse themselves in the field of study through research, lectures, and several group activities. Participation in this course will provide students the opportunity to practice written communication, time management, critical thinking, information literacy, and social responsibility.

  • All Lies: Understanding Deception & Pathological Lying

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Drew Curtis (Psychology)
    Section F24

    Everyone Lies. Does everyone lie often? How do we know when we are being lied to? Unfortunately, people do not show signs of deception by their nose growing. In this course we will discuss and read material related to deception, its occurrence in various contexts, its effects, and abilities to detect deception. Students in this course will discuss deception and pathological lying, read selected literature, write about deception, and watch video segments that will enhance understanding of deception and promote successful academic skills.

  • Career Explorations

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Mario Barrientos (Mathematics)
    Section F25

    This course will use an online assessment (YouScience) to help the student determine personal interests and aptitudes. In addition, this course will enable students to analyze and discuss media, while empowering them with knowledge about sources of personal and institutional bias. Specifically, the students will closely view (or read) a variety of articles from different media sources while using basic analytical tools to determine the source’s possible inaccuracy or bias. In addition, strategies for academic success will be developed.

  • Investing and Personal Finance

    TR 3:30-4:20
    Dennis Hall (Mathematics )
    Section F26

    An introduction to the idea of how to “Get Rich Slowly.” A guide to investing and personal finance, risk assessment, loans, and avoiding scams.

  • Avoid the Freshman 15: The Keys to Staying Healthy in College

    TR 3:30-4:20
    You-jou Hung (Physical Therapy )
    Section F27

    According to the American College of Health Association (ACHA), only 61.6% of college students were at a healthy weight, 48.7% of students met the federal guidelines for aerobic physical activities, only 37.6% of students met the federal guidelines for muscle-strengthening activities. The goal of the course is to help freshmen develop a healthy lifestyle with a proper diet and exercise regimen. In this interactive course, students will learn about healthy diet, supplements, and the normal values of various health/fitness markers (such as heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, cardiopulmonary fitness, body mass index, body composition/body fat, and muscle strength endurance). More importantly, students will have hands-on experience in testing some of those markers to assess their own health and fitness level. The instructor will further provide guidance to improve students’ health and fitness, or direct the students to proper health professionals as needed.

  • Sport Champions & Their Sponsors

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Gayle Randall (Management / Marketing )
    Section F28

    In this course, students will read various articles and books that describe the journeys of those athletes who have reached high points of success in sports, as well as the marketing efforts that have communicated their achievements in order to promote products and services. This course will include article and book research on various sports champions, by each student, with a class presentation by each student of an athlete of their choice. The application of these skills will help improve and develop research, writing, and presentation skills necessary for success at the university level.

  • National Park Road Trip

    MW 12:00-12:50
    David Bixler (Physics & Geosciences)
    Section F29

    This specific section is an interdisciplinary study of the U.S. National Park system. Students will analyze and discuss the beauty of the national parks and the challenges faced by the national park system. Finally, students will plan a detailed road trip to a national park of their choosing. Along the way, students will also learn basic skills needed to be successful in college such as using Blackboard, the Library, and the Writing Center.

  • Pseudoscience & Media

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Andy Wallace (Physics & Geosciences)
    Section F30

    This course emphasizes the use of information literacy, oral communication, and writing skills for distinguishing science from pseudoscience. Contemporary topics taken from advertising, news, and other media are investigated and discussed to develop an understanding of scientific inquiry.

  • Fantasy Football and Collegiate Success

    TR 3:30 - 4:20
    Clint Havins (Student Life)
    Section F31

    This course will use the concept of fantasy football and illustrate how it applies in an educational setting. As surprising as it may seem, fantasy football is a huge phenomenon. It seems counterintuitive due to the fact that in order to be a good player (and give yourself the best chance of winning), it requires thorough planning, organization, coordination, and research. Although it takes copious amounts of work and effort to be successful, it is a very fun game.

    When fantasy football is examined through an educational lens, there are many overlapping themes. In order to be successful in either endeavor, the four previously mentioned characteristics are essential. Along with those four, some others are important including, but not limited to, time management, study skills, following established rules, working with others, mapping out a road to success (graduation), and good, old-fashioned work ethic (follow-through).

  • First Gen Rams

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Jessica Gooch (Student Affairs)
    Section F32

    This course will provide support for those that are the first in their family to graduate from college, get you connected to resources and staff, and provide a safe space for you to navigate your transition into Angelo State. Becoming the first in your family to earn a degree truly changes your family tree and we want to help!

  • Career Exploration/YouScience for Undeclared Majors

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Kevin Lambert (Visual & Performing Arts)
    Section F33

    The purpose of Career Exploration is to help you learn what interests and skills you have and match them to careers in which those interests and skills are relevant. The course also includes self-evaluation and discussion about your capacity and ambition to succeed as a student at Angelo State University.

  • Seven Habits of Highly Effective College Students

    TR 3:30-4:20
    Veronica Snow (Kinesiology)
    Section F34

    Signature Courses create a classroom environment where first-year students can interact with faculty regarding intellectual topics of mutual interest and can engage in shared inquiry and the practice of reasoning. Signature courses are structured around writing, oral communication, and information literacy. The small size and interdisciplinary nature of signature courses foster exploration and scholarly exchange among students and with the instructor. Students enrolled in a signature course become active members of ASU’s intellectual community through the Faculty Lecture Series.

  • How to Manage College as an Introvert

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Leah Carruth (Teacher Education )
    Section F35

    This course will engage students in a variety of strategies to maneuver through the college experience. Adequate understanding of self in terms of personal learning styles, social adjustment skills, and how you interact with others play an important role in the university setting.

  • True Crime: You Be the Detective

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Carlos Flores (Teacher Education)
    Section F36

    Are you a true crime junkie? Do you like to follow true crime podcasts, television shows, books, and anything you can get your hands on? This is the course for you! This course will utilize true crime podcasts to dive into the world of crime. We will examine 7 true crimes. Some of the cases are still unsolved to this day. You will need to put your detective skills to work and figure out who you think committed the crime. Who knows? Perhaps we will find a clue that can help solve a cold case!

  • Career Exploration

    TR 3:30-4:20
    Donna Gee (Teacher Education)
    Section F37

    In this class, you will learn about your strengths and the resources available to you at ASU. You will begin to find ways to match your interests to a career and align your studies at ASU to match that career. The immediate goal of this course is to gain clarity about your interests and choice of major.

  • The Ram Band and You: Being Successful While Staying Involved

    TR 3:30-4:20
    Jonathan Alvis (Visual & Performing Arts)
    Section F39

    Getting involved is a crucial and fun part of the college experience. But it can also be very time-consuming. In this course, we will discuss multiple ways to maximize your time, utilize university resources, achieve at the highest level, and graduate on time while still staying involved and having the greatest of college experiences.

  • Zombies and Brains

    MW 12:00 - 12:50
    Steven Brewer (Psychology)
    Section F40

    Zombies are everywhere! They have invaded movies, television, video games, and print media and it appears only a shot to the head will stop them. We seem to love these shambling, rotting, brain-eating creatures. This course will explore basic neuroscience and neuroanatomy through the lighthearted (or rotting-hearted) lens of Zombies. We will watch and read zombie-related media to discuss the behavioral aspects of what constitutes a zombie and relate those behaviors to actual neuroscience. The overarching goal of this course will be to focus on skills you need as a beginning college student (written communication, oral communication, and information literacy) within the context of zombies and neuroscience. The skills you develop in this course are the skills you will need in every college course.

  • Graphic Design Workshop

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Edwin Cuenco (Visual and Performing Arts)
    Section F41

    This is a creative short course in the world of graphic design. Whether you’re a freshman or high school graduate looking for more insight into graphic design, or just someone looking to learn something new, everyone will get something out of this graphic design workshop. Students will provide design solutions using the elements of design while exploring the expressive potential of type and digital imaging to create dynamic, visual compositions. Through hands-on projects, collaborative learning and client-based work, students will learn the language and process for design thinking, gain a foundation in visual literacy and understanding of rhythm balance, emphasis, and scale using appropriate design elements such as line, texture, grid, color, and type. In this class, we encourage everyone to express their creativity while working within the constraints of an assignment, take part in class critiques, conduct visual research and report writing. We highly encourage creativity and experimentation.

  • Career Exploration

    MW 12:00 - 12:50
    Brenda Norton (Political Science)
    Section F42

    In this class, you will learn about the facilities available to you at ASU and yourself. You will begin to find ways to match your interests to a career and how to craft your studies at ASU to match that career. In this way, you will begin to find your path as an adult.

  • Movies as Zombie Protection

    TR 8:00-8:50
    John Vinklarek (Visual and Performing Arts)
    Section F43

    Since the processes of filmmaking are in many cases hidden to the audience, extra efforts need to be applied by viewers of film. However, with a little practice, one can develop adequate skill to recognize the essence of film language. By failing to identify such fundamentals as editing and framing the viewer is vulnerable to only understanding film as narrative. We will avoid the brainless zombie condition by focusing our analytical skills on the visual data that hints at how films are made. Opportunities to demonstrate critical analysis will be in the form of; 1) Class practice 2) written assignments 3) oral presentation 4) objective test. The study involved with other academic disciplines or career paths can be enhanced by using the critical skills cultivated in this class.

  • A Brief History & Introduction to Breeding Livestock in the US

    MW 12:00-12:50
    John Langdon (Agriculture)
    Section F44

    My goal for this course is for it to be useful and fun. I want this course to provide students with a general foundational knowledge and perhaps discover/inspire further interest in the field of animal science. Specifically genetics and livestock breeding as a discipline (subfield) of animal science, for which there is substantial industry demand and job availability.

  • Pregnant Males & Virgin Birth?

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Mike Dixon (Biology )
    Section F45

    Seminar on various contemporary topics. This course is designed to introduce incoming freshmen to the intellectual and cultural environment of the university and the impact it will have on their lives as students. Freshman Seminars incorporate various integral elements in order to facilitate first-year students’ transition from high school to college-level learning. Emphasis will be on communication, critical thinking, and information literacy. Open to all majors; restricted to and required of first-time-in-college students.

  • Questing for Success

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Connie Heimann (Biology )
    Section F46

    Strategies for success in MMORPGs (Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games) have many commonalities with strategies for success in college. Being successful in games like World of Warcraft and Everquest requires good time and resource management skills as well as abilities to work well with groups, good written communication skills, and the ability to understand and follow written directions. Coming to college brings a whole suite of challenges to freshmen, especially those who have never lived away from home before. To help ease students’ transition to becoming autonomous, productive adults, this course will use a problem-solving format to help students learn how to think through common problems, learn how to do everyday skills that they may not have before leaving home, and teach skills necessary for both navigating their new environment at Angelo State University and critical life skills that will set them on the path to being an adult. Students in the course will create “quests” that break down required tasks for various assignments. Class discussions will include practical information on a variety of topics including time management, maintaining a healthy lifestyle, study skills, and using the resources of the university. We will also discuss topics such as resilience and perseverance, financial health, etc. Real-time problems of the students in the course will drive some of the content of the course. Emphasis will be on using critical thinking skills to reason out problems.

  • Dumb Money

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Trey Holik (Physics and Geosciences)
    Section F47

    This course introduces students to the intellectual and cultural environment of the university. The course incorporates elements in order to facilitate first-year students’ transition from high school to college-level learning. Emphasis will be on communication, critical thinking, and information literacy. 

    This specific section involves Managing Finances. Students will develop a personal budget, investigate financial services, and create an investment portfolio. Students will also learn basic skills needed to be successful in college such as using Blackboard, the Library, Microsoft Office, and the Writing Center.

  • The Art of Zymurgy

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Nick Negovetich (Biology )
    Section F48

    An introduction to the scientific and artistic aspects leading to the development of the beer styles of the world. This course will focus on processes and methods used in brewing to develop the complex flavors and aromas of different beer styles. Emphasis in describing the styles will focus on avoiding ambiguous adjectives so that descriptions are accurate and precise.

  • Ram Fam Life Skills Development

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Joe’l Mathews (Athletics)
    Section F49

    This course is designed to assist first-year students, student-athletes or those interested in athletics post-graduation with a successful transition to Angelo State University both academically and athletically. This course will work to incorporate the Angelo State University Core Values into the course modules over the 8 weeks. Students will be provided the opportunity to connect with and hear from a variety of individuals throughout Angelo State Athletics and the Angelo State University Community. Students will be challenged to examine their experiences while promoting self-awareness to take notes, develop and submit assignments. The information presented in this course will help provide a foundation for the student to become an active, successful, member of their given team, Angelo State academics and community.

  • Thinking about Teaching

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Dessie Davis (English and Modern Languages )
    Section F51

    Signature Courses create a classroom environment where first-year students can interact with faculty and peers regarding intellectual topics of mutual interest and can engage in shared inquiry and the practice of critical thinking. Signature courses are structured around writing, oral communication, and information literacy. The small size and interdisciplinary nature of signature courses foster exploration and scholarly exchange among students and with the instructor. Students enrolled in a signature course become active members of ASU’s intellectual community.

  • You Like Anime Too?!

    TR 3:30-4:20
    Judith Gonzalez (English & Modern Languages)
    Section F52

    Anime is everywhere now! It has become so popular that it can be found on all major streaming sites, and anime movies are being played in cinemas all over the world. With its increasing popularity and accessibility, watching anime has become a hobby that no longer renders one below the nerds of nerds in schools’ social hierarchies. The purpose of this course is to introduce incoming freshmen to the academic and cultural environment of the university through a topic of mutual interest between students and faculty. Freshmen Seminars are structured around writing, oral communication, and information literacy. Therefore, in this course, students will be able to learn and build upon skills necessary to succeed in college through the topic of anime.

  • Career & Major Exploration

    MW 12:00-12:50
    John Wegner (English and Modern Languages)
    Section F53

    All incoming college students must adjust to the increased academic expectations and the newfound freedom associated with a university setting. Our goal is to help each of you prepare for those demands by giving you some specific skill sets that will help you prepare for success. In this class, you will learn about yourself and the facilities available to you at ASU. You will begin to find ways to match your interests to a career and align your studies at ASU to match that career. The immediate goal of this course is to gain clarity about your best fit major.

  • American Culture & Academic Life (For International Students Only)

    TR 3:30-4:20
    Katie Jones (English Modern Languages )
    Section F54

    The purpose of this course is to increase skills and knowledge of American culture among international students and enhance their integration into the university community. Throughout the course, students will gain an understanding of both national and local culture. In addition, students will be introduced to campus resources and strategies that will help them to be academically successful and to enhance their study abroad experience. The course will provide opportunities in and out of class for students to learn about American culture and values, apply critical reading skills, practice oral and written communication, and get involved in campus life.

  • Peoples and Cultures of Africa

    MW 12:00 - 12:50
    Babajide Sadiq (Health Science Professions)
    Section F55

    This course will explore some fundamental principles that are necessary for understanding the many hundreds of societies and cultures that exist in Africa. The goal is to help develop a more nuanced and analytical perspective of Africa and its place in the world, both past and present. The course hopes to dispel some of the many stereotypes about Africa that are perpetuated in the West.

  • Answering Fermi’s Paradox

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Kenneth Carrell (Physics and Geosciences)
    Section F60

    Normally attributed to Enrico Fermi, the question of ‘where is everyone?’ is more relevant today than when it was first asked about 70 years ago. In this course, we will learn about Fermi’s Paradox and then explore some of its potential solutions. A connection between these and campus life at ASU will be made with an emphasis on how students can solve their own Fermi Paradox.

  • Perspective Check: Acknowledging Diverse Viewpoints

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Kristen Lyons and Tamra Kelly (Curriculum & Instruction)
    Section F61

    Perspective: a particular attitude toward or way of regarding something; a point of view. In our ever-changing world, we are constantly challenged socially, emotionally, physically, and spiritually to see how we interpret the information around us and how it aligns with our current impressions. Using different forms of media, students in this course will explore the meaning of perspective. Each week, the presented activity will challenge the students to check their perspective with the hopes of broadening and opening their point of view while at the same time solidifying their standpoint.

  • Post-Apocalyptic Board Games

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Shirley Simpson (Social Work and Sociology)
    Section F62

    In this course, students will use post-apocalyptic board games and videos as a vehicle to understand world-building from a sociological perspective. They will grapple with questions of social significance for example, what happens after people survive a cataclysmic event? Where do they go? Who do they trust? How do they rebuild? How do their decisions affect their life chances and those of their progeny? While students will be asked to play solo board games or work with others online, the emphasis will be critical thinking and sociological analysis.

  • Graphic Design with Adobe Illustrator

    MW 12:00-12:50
    Benedict Sum (Visual & Performing Arts)
    Section F63

    This is an introductory studio/laboratory course in Graphic Illustration. The course is designed to foster a foundational understanding of the basic conceptual and pictorial concepts of Graphic Illustration. Traditional themes and common practices encountered in commercial illustration will be investigated. Emphasis is placed upon the development of studio skills and exploration of various media and techniques.